last sync: 2023-Jan-27 18:40:07 UTC

Azure Policy definition

All network ports should be restricted on network security groups associated to your virtual machine

Name All network ports should be restricted on network security groups associated to your virtual machine
Azure Portal
Id 9daedab3-fb2d-461e-b861-71790eead4f6
Version 3.0.0
details on versioning
Category Security Center
Microsoft docs
Description Azure Security Center has identified some of your network security groups' inbound rules to be too permissive. Inbound rules should not allow access from 'Any' or 'Internet' ranges. This can potentially enable attackers to target your resources.
Mode All
Type BuiltIn
Preview FALSE
Deprecated FALSE
Effect Default
AuditIfNotExists
Allowed
AuditIfNotExists, Disabled
RBAC
Role(s)
none
Rule
Aliases
THEN-ExistenceCondition (1)
Alias Namespace ResourceType DefaultPath Modifiable
Microsoft.Security/assessments/status.code Microsoft.Security assessments properties.status.code false
Rule
ResourceTypes
IF (1)
Microsoft.ClassicCompute/virtualMachines
Compliance The following 56 compliance controls are associated with this Policy definition 'All network ports should be restricted on network security groups associated to your virtual machine' (9daedab3-fb2d-461e-b861-71790eead4f6)
Control Domain Control Name MetadataId Category Title Owner Requirements Description Info Policy#
Azure_Security_Benchmark_v3.0 NS-1 Azure_Security_Benchmark_v3.0_NS-1 Azure Security Benchmark NS-1 Network Security Establish network segmentation boundaries Shared **Security Principle:** Ensure that your virtual network deployment aligns to your enterprise segmentation strategy defined in the GS-2 security control. Any workload that could incur higher risk for the organization should be in isolated virtual networks. Examples of high-risk workload include: - An application storing or processing highly sensitive data. - An external network-facing application accessible by the public or users outside of your organization. - An application using insecure architecture or containing vulnerabilities that cannot be easily remediated. To enhance your enterprise segmentation strategy, restrict or monitor traffic between internal resources using network controls. For specific, well-defined applications (such as a 3-tier app), this can be a highly secure "deny by default, permit by exception" approach by restricting the ports, protocols, source, and destination IPs of the network traffic. If you have many applications and endpoints interacting with each other, blocking traffic may not scale well, and you may only be able to monitor traffic. **Azure Guidance:** Create a virtual network (VNet) as a fundamental segmentation approach in your Azure network, so resources such as VMs can be deployed into the VNet within a network boundary. To further segment the network, you can create subnets inside VNet for smaller sub-networks. Use network security groups (NSG) as a network layer control to restrict or monitor traffic by port, protocol, source IP address, or destination IP address. You can also use application security groups (ASGs) to simplify complex configuration. Instead of defining policy based on explicit IP addresses in network security groups, ASGs enable you to configure network security as a natural extension of an application's structure, allowing you to group virtual machines and define network security policies based on those groups. **Implementation and additional context:** Azure Virtual Network concepts and best practices: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/virtual-network/concepts-and-best-practices Add, change, or delete a virtual network subnet: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/virtual-network/virtual-network-manage-subnet How to create a network security group with security rules: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/virtual-network/tutorial-filter-network-traffic Understand and use application security groups: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/virtual-network/network-security-groups-overview#application-security-groups n/a link 5
CCCS SC-7 CCCS_SC-7 CCCS SC-7 System and Communications Protection Boundary Protection n/a (A) The information system monitors and controls communications at the external boundary of the system and at key internal boundaries within the system. (B) The information system implements sub-networks for publicly accessible system components that are physically or logically separated from internal organizational networks. (C) The information system connects to external networks or information systems only through managed interfaces consisting of boundary protection devices arranged in accordance with an organizational security architecture. link 3
CMMC_2.0_L2 AC.L2-3.1.3 CMMC_2.0_L2_AC.L2-3.1.3 404 not found n/a n/a 54
CMMC_2.0_L2 SC.L1-3.13.1 CMMC_2.0_L2_SC.L1-3.13.1 404 not found n/a n/a 58
CMMC_2.0_L2 SC.L1-3.13.5 CMMC_2.0_L2_SC.L1-3.13.5 404 not found n/a n/a 53
CMMC_2.0_L2 SC.L2-3.13.2 CMMC_2.0_L2_SC.L2-3.13.2 404 not found n/a n/a 53
CMMC_2.0_L2 SC.L2-3.13.6 CMMC_2.0_L2_SC.L2-3.13.6 404 not found n/a n/a 28
CMMC_L3 CM.2.064 CMMC_L3_CM.2.064 CMMC L3 CM.2.064 Configuration Management Establish and enforce security configuration settings for information technology products employed in organizational systems. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Configuration settings are the set of parameters that can be changed in hardware, software, or firmware components of the system that affect the security posture or functionality of the system. Information technology products for which security-related configuration settings can be defined include mainframe computers, servers, workstations, input and output devices (e.g., scanners, copiers, and printers), network components (e.g., firewalls, routers, gateways, voice and data switches, wireless access points, network appliances, sensors), operating systems, middleware, and applications. Security parameters are those parameters impacting the security state of systems including the parameters required to satisfy other security requirements. Security parameters include: registry settings; account, file, directory permission settings; and settings for functions, ports, protocols, and remote connections. Organizations establish organization-wide configuration settings and subsequently derive specific configuration settings for systems. The established settings become part of the systems configuration baseline. Common secure configurations (also referred to as security configuration checklists, lockdown and hardening guides, security reference guides, security technical implementation guides) provide recognized, standardized, and established benchmarks that stipulate secure configuration settings for specific information technology platforms/products and instructions for configuring those system components to meet operational requirements. Common secure configurations can be developed by a variety of organizations including information technology product developers, manufacturers, vendors, consortia, academia, industry, federal agencies, and other organizations in the public and private sectors. link 10
CMMC_L3 CM.3.068 CMMC_L3_CM.3.068 CMMC L3 CM.3.068 Configuration Management Restrict, disable, or prevent the use of nonessential programs, functions, ports, protocols, and services. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Restricting the use of nonessential software (programs) includes restricting the roles allowed to approve program execution; prohibiting auto-execute; program blacklisting and whitelisting; or restricting the number of program instances executed at the same time. The organization makes a security-based determination which functions, ports, protocols, and/or services are restricted. Bluetooth, File Transfer Protocol (FTP), and peer-to-peer networking are examples of protocols organizations consider preventing the use of, restricting, or disabling. link 25
CMMC_L3 SC.1.175 CMMC_L3_SC.1.175 CMMC L3 SC.1.175 System and Communications Protection Monitor, control, and protect communications (i.e., information transmitted or received by organizational systems) at the external boundaries and key internal boundaries of organizational systems. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Communications can be monitored, controlled, and protected at boundary components and by restricting or prohibiting interfaces in organizational systems. Boundary components include gateways, routers, firewalls, guards, network-based malicious code analysis and virtualization systems, or encrypted tunnels implemented within a system security architecture (e.g., routers protecting firewalls or application gateways residing on protected subnetworks). Restricting or prohibiting interfaces in organizational systems includes restricting external web communications traffic to designated web servers within managed interfaces and prohibiting external traffic that appears to be spoofing internal addresses. Organizations consider the shared nature of commercial telecommunications services in the implementation of security requirements associated with the use of such services. Commercial telecommunications services are commonly based on network components and consolidated management systems shared by all attached commercial customers and may also include third party-provided access lines and other service elements. Such transmission services may represent sources of increased risk despite contract security provisions. link 32
CMMC_L3 SC.1.176 CMMC_L3_SC.1.176 CMMC L3 SC.1.176 System and Communications Protection Implement subnetworks for publicly accessible system components that are physically or logically separated from internal networks. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Subnetworks that are physically or logically separated from internal networks are referred to as demilitarized zones (DMZs). DMZs are typically implemented with boundary control devices and techniques that include routers, gateways, firewalls, virtualization, or cloud-based technologies. link 5
CMMC_L3 SC.3.183 CMMC_L3_SC.3.183 CMMC L3 SC.3.183 System and Communications Protection Deny network communications traffic by default and allow network communications traffic by exception (i.e., deny all, permit by exception). Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. This requirement applies to inbound and outbound network communications traffic at the system boundary and at identified points within the system. A deny-all, permit-by-exception network communications traffic policy ensures that only those connections which are essential and approved are allowed. link 32
FedRAMP_High_R4 AC-4 FedRAMP_High_R4_AC-4 FedRAMP High AC-4 Access Control Information Flow Enforcement Shared n/a The information system enforces approved authorizations for controlling the flow of information within the system and between interconnected systems based on [Assignment: organization-defined information flow control policies]. Supplemental Guidance: Information flow control regulates where information is allowed to travel within an information system and between information systems (as opposed to who is allowed to access the information) and without explicit regard to subsequent accesses to that information. Flow control restrictions include, for example, keeping export-controlled information from being transmitted in the clear to the Internet, blocking outside traffic that claims to be from within the organization, restricting web requests to the Internet that are not from the internal web proxy server, and limiting information transfers between organizations based on data structures and content. Transferring information between information systems representing different security domains with different security policies introduces risk that such transfers violate one or more domain security policies. In such situations, information owners/stewards provide guidance at designated policy enforcement points between interconnected systems. Organizations consider mandating specific architectural solutions when required to enforce specific security policies. Enforcement includes, for example: (i) prohibiting information transfers between interconnected systems (i.e., allowing access only); (ii) employing hardware mechanisms to enforce one-way information flows; and (iii) implementing trustworthy regarding mechanisms to reassign security attributes and security labels. Organizations commonly employ information flow control policies and enforcement mechanisms to control the flow of information between designated sources and destinations (e.g., networks, individuals, and devices) within information systems and between interconnected systems. Flow control is based on the characteristics of the information and/or the information path. Enforcement occurs, for example, in boundary protection devices (e.g., gateways, routers, guards, encrypted tunnels, firewalls) that employ rule sets or establish configuration settings that restrict information system services, provide a packet-filtering capability based on header information, or message- filtering capability based on message content (e.g., implementing key word searches or using document characteristics). Organizations also consider the trustworthiness of filtering/inspection mechanisms (i.e., hardware, firmware, and software components) that are critical to information flow enforcement. Control enhancements 3 through 22 primarily address cross-domain solution needs which focus on more advanced filtering techniques, in-depth analysis, and stronger flow enforcement mechanisms implemented in cross-domain products, for example, high-assurance guards. Such capabilities are generally not available in commercial off-the-shelf information technology products. Related controls: AC-3, AC-17, AC-19, AC-21, CM-6, CM-7, SA-8, SC-2, SC-5, SC-7, SC-18. References: None. link 54
FedRAMP_High_R4 SC-7 FedRAMP_High_R4_SC-7 FedRAMP High SC-7 System And Communications Protection Boundary Protection Shared n/a The information system: a. Monitors and controls communications at the external boundary of the system and at key internal boundaries within the system; b. Implements subnetworks for publicly accessible system components that are [Selection: physically; logically] separated from internal organizational networks; and c. Connects to external networks or information systems only through managed interfaces consisting of boundary protection devices arranged in accordance with an organizational security architecture. Supplemental Guidance: Managed interfaces include, for example, gateways, routers, firewalls, guards, network-based malicious code analysis and virtualization systems, or encrypted tunnels implemented within a security architecture (e.g., routers protecting firewalls or application gateways residing on protected subnetworks). Subnetworks that are physically or logically separated from internal networks are referred to as demilitarized zones or DMZs. Restricting or prohibiting interfaces within organizational information systems includes, for example, restricting external web traffic to designated web servers within managed interfaces and prohibiting external traffic that appears to be spoofing internal addresses. Organizations consider the shared nature of commercial telecommunications services in the implementation of security controls associated with the use of such services. Commercial telecommunications services are commonly based on network components and consolidated management systems shared by all attached commercial customers, and may also include third party-provided access lines and other service elements. Such transmission services may represent sources of increased risk despite contract security provisions. Related controls: AC-4, AC-17, CA-3, CM-7, CP-8, IR-4, RA-3, SC-5, SC-13. References: FIPS Publication 199; NIST Special Publications 800-41, 800-77. link 54
FedRAMP_High_R4 SC-7(3) FedRAMP_High_R4_SC-7(3) FedRAMP High SC-7 (3) System And Communications Protection Access Points Shared n/a The organization limits the number of external network connections to the information system. Supplemental Guidance: Limiting the number of external network connections facilitates more comprehensive monitoring of inbound and outbound communications traffic. The Trusted Internet Connection (TIC) initiative is an example of limiting the number of external network connections. link 53
FedRAMP_Moderate_R4 AC-4 FedRAMP_Moderate_R4_AC-4 FedRAMP Moderate AC-4 Access Control Information Flow Enforcement Shared n/a The information system enforces approved authorizations for controlling the flow of information within the system and between interconnected systems based on [Assignment: organization-defined information flow control policies]. Supplemental Guidance: Information flow control regulates where information is allowed to travel within an information system and between information systems (as opposed to who is allowed to access the information) and without explicit regard to subsequent accesses to that information. Flow control restrictions include, for example, keeping export-controlled information from being transmitted in the clear to the Internet, blocking outside traffic that claims to be from within the organization, restricting web requests to the Internet that are not from the internal web proxy server, and limiting information transfers between organizations based on data structures and content. Transferring information between information systems representing different security domains with different security policies introduces risk that such transfers violate one or more domain security policies. In such situations, information owners/stewards provide guidance at designated policy enforcement points between interconnected systems. Organizations consider mandating specific architectural solutions when required to enforce specific security policies. Enforcement includes, for example: (i) prohibiting information transfers between interconnected systems (i.e., allowing access only); (ii) employing hardware mechanisms to enforce one-way information flows; and (iii) implementing trustworthy regarding mechanisms to reassign security attributes and security labels. Organizations commonly employ information flow control policies and enforcement mechanisms to control the flow of information between designated sources and destinations (e.g., networks, individuals, and devices) within information systems and between interconnected systems. Flow control is based on the characteristics of the information and/or the information path. Enforcement occurs, for example, in boundary protection devices (e.g., gateways, routers, guards, encrypted tunnels, firewalls) that employ rule sets or establish configuration settings that restrict information system services, provide a packet-filtering capability based on header information, or message- filtering capability based on message content (e.g., implementing key word searches or using document characteristics). Organizations also consider the trustworthiness of filtering/inspection mechanisms (i.e., hardware, firmware, and software components) that are critical to information flow enforcement. Control enhancements 3 through 22 primarily address cross-domain solution needs which focus on more advanced filtering techniques, in-depth analysis, and stronger flow enforcement mechanisms implemented in cross-domain products, for example, high-assurance guards. Such capabilities are generally not available in commercial off-the-shelf information technology products. Related controls: AC-3, AC-17, AC-19, AC-21, CM-6, CM-7, SA-8, SC-2, SC-5, SC-7, SC-18. References: None. link 54
FedRAMP_Moderate_R4 SC-7 FedRAMP_Moderate_R4_SC-7 FedRAMP Moderate SC-7 System And Communications Protection Boundary Protection Shared n/a The information system: a. Monitors and controls communications at the external boundary of the system and at key internal boundaries within the system; b. Implements subnetworks for publicly accessible system components that are [Selection: physically; logically] separated from internal organizational networks; and c. Connects to external networks or information systems only through managed interfaces consisting of boundary protection devices arranged in accordance with an organizational security architecture. Supplemental Guidance: Managed interfaces include, for example, gateways, routers, firewalls, guards, network-based malicious code analysis and virtualization systems, or encrypted tunnels implemented within a security architecture (e.g., routers protecting firewalls or application gateways residing on protected subnetworks). Subnetworks that are physically or logically separated from internal networks are referred to as demilitarized zones or DMZs. Restricting or prohibiting interfaces within organizational information systems includes, for example, restricting external web traffic to designated web servers within managed interfaces and prohibiting external traffic that appears to be spoofing internal addresses. Organizations consider the shared nature of commercial telecommunications services in the implementation of security controls associated with the use of such services. Commercial telecommunications services are commonly based on network components and consolidated management systems shared by all attached commercial customers, and may also include third party-provided access lines and other service elements. Such transmission services may represent sources of increased risk despite contract security provisions. Related controls: AC-4, AC-17, CA-3, CM-7, CP-8, IR-4, RA-3, SC-5, SC-13. References: FIPS Publication 199; NIST Special Publications 800-41, 800-77. link 54
FedRAMP_Moderate_R4 SC-7(3) FedRAMP_Moderate_R4_SC-7(3) FedRAMP Moderate SC-7 (3) System And Communications Protection Access Points Shared n/a The organization limits the number of external network connections to the information system. Supplemental Guidance: Limiting the number of external network connections facilitates more comprehensive monitoring of inbound and outbound communications traffic. The Trusted Internet Connection (TIC) initiative is an example of limiting the number of external network connections. link 53
hipaa 0858.09m1Organizational.4-09.m hipaa-0858.09m1Organizational.4-09.m 0858.09m1Organizational.4-09.m 08 Network Protection 0858.09m1Organizational.4-09.m 09.06 Network Security Management Shared n/a The organization monitors for all authorized and unauthorized wireless access to the information system and prohibits installation of wireless access points (WAPs) unless explicitly authorized in writing by the CIO or his/her designated representative. 7
IRS_1075_9.3 .16.5 IRS_1075_9.3.16.5 IRS 1075 9.3.16.5 System and Communications Protection Boundary Protection (SC-7) n/a The information system must: a. Monitor and control communications at the external boundary of the system and at key internal boundaries within the system b. Implement subnetworks for publicly accessible system components that are physically and logically separated from internal agency networks c. Connect to external networks or information systems only through managed interfaces consisting of boundary protection devices arranged in accordance with agency security architecture requirements Managed interfaces include, for example, gateways, routers, firewalls, guards, network-based malicious code analysis and virtualization systems, or encrypted tunnels implemented within the security architecture (e.g., routers protecting firewalls or application gateways residing on protected subnetworks). The agency must limit the number of external network connections to the information system. (CE3) The agency must: (CE4) a. Implement a secure managed interface for each external telecommunication service b. Establish a traffic flow policy for each managed interface d. Protect the confidentiality and integrity of the information being transmitted across each interface e. Document each exception to the traffic flow policy with a supporting mission/business need and duration of that need, and accept the associated risk f. Review exceptions to the traffic flow policy at a minimum annually, and remove exceptions that are no longer supported by an explicit mission/business need The information system at managed interfaces must deny network communications traffic by default and allow network communications traffic by exception (i.e., deny all, permit by exception). (CE5) The information system must, in conjunction with a remote device, prevent the device from simultaneously establishing non-remote connections with the system and communicating via some other connection to resources in external networks. (CE7) Additional requirements for protecting FTI on networks are provided in Section 9.4.10, Network Protections. link 4
ISO27001-2013 A.13.1.1 ISO27001-2013_A.13.1.1 ISO 27001:2013 A.13.1.1 Communications Security Network controls Shared n/a Networks shall be managed and controlled to protect information in systems and applications. link 40
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .1.3 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.1.3 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.1.3 Access Control Control the flow of CUI in accordance with approved authorizations. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Information flow control regulates where information can travel within a system and between systems (versus who can access the information) and without explicit regard to subsequent accesses to that information. Flow control restrictions include the following: keeping export-controlled information from being transmitted in the clear to the Internet; blocking outside traffic that claims to be from within the organization; restricting requests to the Internet that are not from the internal web proxy server; and limiting information transfers between organizations based on data structures and content. Organizations commonly use information flow control policies and enforcement mechanisms to control the flow of information between designated sources and destinations (e.g., networks, individuals, and devices) within systems and between interconnected systems. Flow control is based on characteristics of the information or the information path. Enforcement occurs in boundary protection devices (e.g., gateways, routers, guards, encrypted tunnels, firewalls) that employ rule sets or establish configuration settings that restrict system services, provide a packet-filtering capability based on header information, or message-filtering capability based on message content (e.g., implementing key word searches or using document characteristics). Organizations also consider the trustworthiness of filtering and inspection mechanisms (i.e., hardware, firmware, and software components) that are critical to information flow enforcement. Transferring information between systems representing different security domains with different security policies introduces risk that such transfers violate one or more domain security policies. In such situations, information owners or stewards provide guidance at designated policy enforcement points between interconnected systems. Organizations consider mandating specific architectural solutions when required to enforce specific security policies. Enforcement includes: prohibiting information transfers between interconnected systems (i.e., allowing access only); employing hardware mechanisms to enforce one-way information flows; and implementing trustworthy regrading mechanisms to reassign security attributes and security labels. link 58
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .13.1 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.13.1 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.13.1 System and Communications Protection Monitor, control, and protect communications (i.e., information transmitted or received by organizational systems) at the external boundaries and key internal boundaries of organizational systems. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Communications can be monitored, controlled, and protected at boundary components and by restricting or prohibiting interfaces in organizational systems. Boundary components include gateways, routers, firewalls, guards, network-based malicious code analysis and virtualization systems, or encrypted tunnels implemented within a system security architecture (e.g., routers protecting firewalls or application gateways residing on protected subnetworks). Restricting or prohibiting interfaces in organizational systems includes restricting external web communications traffic to designated web servers within managed interfaces and prohibiting external traffic that appears to be spoofing internal addresses. Organizations consider the shared nature of commercial telecommunications services in the implementation of security requirements associated with the use of such services. Commercial telecommunications services are commonly based on network components and consolidated management systems shared by all attached commercial customers and may also include third party-provided access lines and other service elements. Such transmission services may represent sources of increased risk despite contract security provisions. [SP 800-41] provides guidance on firewalls and firewall policy. [SP 800-125B] provides guidance on security for virtualization technologies. [28] There is no prescribed format or specified level of detail for system security plans. However, organizations ensure that the required information in 3.12.4 is conveyed in those plans. link 53
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .13.2 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.13.2 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.13.2 System and Communications Protection Employ architectural designs, software development techniques, and systems engineering principles that promote effective information security within organizational systems. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Organizations apply systems security engineering principles to new development systems or systems undergoing major upgrades. For legacy systems, organizations apply systems security engineering principles to system upgrades and modifications to the extent feasible, given the current state of hardware, software, and firmware components within those systems. The application of systems security engineering concepts and principles helps to develop trustworthy, secure, and resilient systems and system components and reduce the susceptibility of organizations to disruptions, hazards, and threats. Examples of these concepts and principles include developing layered protections; establishing security policies, architecture, and controls as the foundation for design; incorporating security requirements into the system development life cycle; delineating physical and logical security boundaries; ensuring that developers are trained on how to build secure software; and performing threat modeling to identify use cases, threat agents, attack vectors and patterns, design patterns, and compensating controls needed to mitigate risk. Organizations that apply security engineering concepts and principles can facilitate the development of trustworthy, secure systems, system components, and system services; reduce risk to acceptable levels; and make informed risk-management decisions. [SP 800-160-1] provides guidance on systems security engineering. link 53
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .13.5 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.13.5 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.13.5 System and Communications Protection Implement subnetworks for publicly accessible system components that are physically or logically separated from internal networks. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Subnetworks that are physically or logically separated from internal networks are referred to as demilitarized zones (DMZs). DMZs are typically implemented with boundary control devices and techniques that include routers, gateways, firewalls, virtualization, or cloud-based technologies. [SP 800-41] provides guidance on firewalls and firewall policy. [SP 800-125B] provides guidance on security for virtualization technologies link 53
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .13.6 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.13.6 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.13.6 System and Communications Protection Deny network communications traffic by default and allow network communications traffic by exception (i.e., deny all, permit by exception). Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. This requirement applies to inbound and outbound network communications traffic at the system boundary and at identified points within the system. A deny-all, permit-by-exception network communications traffic policy ensures that only those connections which are essential and approved are allowed. link 24
NIST_SP_800-53_R4 AC-4 NIST_SP_800-53_R4_AC-4 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 AC-4 Access Control Information Flow Enforcement Shared n/a The information system enforces approved authorizations for controlling the flow of information within the system and between interconnected systems based on [Assignment: organization-defined information flow control policies]. Supplemental Guidance: Information flow control regulates where information is allowed to travel within an information system and between information systems (as opposed to who is allowed to access the information) and without explicit regard to subsequent accesses to that information. Flow control restrictions include, for example, keeping export-controlled information from being transmitted in the clear to the Internet, blocking outside traffic that claims to be from within the organization, restricting web requests to the Internet that are not from the internal web proxy server, and limiting information transfers between organizations based on data structures and content. Transferring information between information systems representing different security domains with different security policies introduces risk that such transfers violate one or more domain security policies. In such situations, information owners/stewards provide guidance at designated policy enforcement points between interconnected systems. Organizations consider mandating specific architectural solutions when required to enforce specific security policies. Enforcement includes, for example: (i) prohibiting information transfers between interconnected systems (i.e., allowing access only); (ii) employing hardware mechanisms to enforce one-way information flows; and (iii) implementing trustworthy regarding mechanisms to reassign security attributes and security labels. Organizations commonly employ information flow control policies and enforcement mechanisms to control the flow of information between designated sources and destinations (e.g., networks, individuals, and devices) within information systems and between interconnected systems. Flow control is based on the characteristics of the information and/or the information path. Enforcement occurs, for example, in boundary protection devices (e.g., gateways, routers, guards, encrypted tunnels, firewalls) that employ rule sets or establish configuration settings that restrict information system services, provide a packet-filtering capability based on header information, or message- filtering capability based on message content (e.g., implementing key word searches or using document characteristics). Organizations also consider the trustworthiness of filtering/inspection mechanisms (i.e., hardware, firmware, and software components) that are critical to information flow enforcement. Control enhancements 3 through 22 primarily address cross-domain solution needs which focus on more advanced filtering techniques, in-depth analysis, and stronger flow enforcement mechanisms implemented in cross-domain products, for example, high-assurance guards. Such capabilities are generally not available in commercial off-the-shelf information technology products. Related controls: AC-3, AC-17, AC-19, AC-21, CM-6, CM-7, SA-8, SC-2, SC-5, SC-7, SC-18. References: None. link 54
NIST_SP_800-53_R4 SC-7 NIST_SP_800-53_R4_SC-7 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 SC-7 System And Communications Protection Boundary Protection Shared n/a The information system: a. Monitors and controls communications at the external boundary of the system and at key internal boundaries within the system; b. Implements subnetworks for publicly accessible system components that are [Selection: physically; logically] separated from internal organizational networks; and c. Connects to external networks or information systems only through managed interfaces consisting of boundary protection devices arranged in accordance with an organizational security architecture. Supplemental Guidance: Managed interfaces include, for example, gateways, routers, firewalls, guards, network-based malicious code analysis and virtualization systems, or encrypted tunnels implemented within a security architecture (e.g., routers protecting firewalls or application gateways residing on protected subnetworks). Subnetworks that are physically or logically separated from internal networks are referred to as demilitarized zones or DMZs. Restricting or prohibiting interfaces within organizational information systems includes, for example, restricting external web traffic to designated web servers within managed interfaces and prohibiting external traffic that appears to be spoofing internal addresses. Organizations consider the shared nature of commercial telecommunications services in the implementation of security controls associated with the use of such services. Commercial telecommunications services are commonly based on network components and consolidated management systems shared by all attached commercial customers, and may also include third party-provided access lines and other service elements. Such transmission services may represent sources of increased risk despite contract security provisions. Related controls: AC-4, AC-17, CA-3, CM-7, CP-8, IR-4, RA-3, SC-5, SC-13. References: FIPS Publication 199; NIST Special Publications 800-41, 800-77. link 54
NIST_SP_800-53_R4 SC-7(3) NIST_SP_800-53_R4_SC-7(3) NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 SC-7 (3) System And Communications Protection Access Points Shared n/a The organization limits the number of external network connections to the information system. Supplemental Guidance: Limiting the number of external network connections facilitates more comprehensive monitoring of inbound and outbound communications traffic. The Trusted Internet Connection (TIC) initiative is an example of limiting the number of external network connections. link 53
NIST_SP_800-53_R5 AC-4 NIST_SP_800-53_R5_AC-4 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 AC-4 Access Control Information Flow Enforcement Shared n/a Enforce approved authorizations for controlling the flow of information within the system and between connected systems based on [Assignment: organization-defined information flow control policies]. link 54
NIST_SP_800-53_R5 SC-7 NIST_SP_800-53_R5_SC-7 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 SC-7 System and Communications Protection Boundary Protection Shared n/a a. Monitor and control communications at the external managed interfaces to the system and at key internal managed interfaces within the system; b. Implement subnetworks for publicly accessible system components that are [Selection: physically;logically] separated from internal organizational networks; and c. Connect to external networks or systems only through managed interfaces consisting of boundary protection devices arranged in accordance with an organizational security and privacy architecture. link 54
NIST_SP_800-53_R5 SC-7(3) NIST_SP_800-53_R5_SC-7(3) NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 SC-7 (3) System and Communications Protection Access Points Shared n/a Limit the number of external network connections to the system. link 53
NZ_ISM_v3.5 GS-3 NZ_ISM_v3.5_GS-3 NZISM Security Benchmark GS-3 Gateway security 19.1.12 Configuration of Gateways Customer n/a Gateways are essential in controlling the flow of information between security domains. Any failure, particularly at the higher classifications, may have serious consequences. Hence mechanisms for alerting personnel to situations that may give rise to information security incidents are especially important for gateways. link 6
NZISM_Security_Benchmark_v1.1 GS-3 NZISM_Security_Benchmark_v1.1_GS-3 NZISM Security Benchmark GS-3 Gateway security 19.1.12 Configuration of Gateways Customer Agencies MUST ensure that gateways: are the only communications paths into and out of internal networks; by default, deny all connections into and out of the network; allow only explicitly authorised connections; are managed via a secure path isolated from all connected networks (i.e. physically at the gateway or on a dedicated administration network); provide sufficient logging and audit capabilities to detect information security incidents, attempted intrusions or anomalous usage patterns; and provide real-time alerts. Gateways are essential in controlling the flow of information between security domains. Any failure, particularly at the higher classifications, may have serious consequences. Hence mechanisms for alerting personnel to situations that may give rise to information security incidents are especially important for gateways. link 6
PCI_DSS_V3.2.1 1.3.2 PCI_DSS_v3.2.1_1.3.2 PCI DSS v3.2.1 1.3.2 Requirement 1 PCI DSS requirement 1.3.2 customer n/a n/a link 2
PCI_DSS_V3.2.1 1.3.4 PCI_DSS_v3.2.1_1.3.4 PCI DSS v3.2.1 1.3.4 Requirement 1 PCI DSS requirement 1.3.4 customer n/a n/a link 2
PCI_DSS_v4.0 1.3.2 PCI_DSS_v4.0_1.3.2 PCI DSS v4.0 1.3.2 Requirement 01: Install and Maintain Network Security Controls Network access to and from the cardholder data environment is restricted Shared n/a Outbound traffic from the CDE is restricted as follows: • To only traffic that is necessary. • All other traffic is specifically denied. link 2
PCI_DSS_v4.0 1.4.2 PCI_DSS_v4.0_1.4.2 PCI DSS v4.0 1.4.2 Requirement 01: Install and Maintain Network Security Controls Network connections between trusted and untrusted networks are controlled Shared n/a Inbound traffic from untrusted networks to trusted networks is restricted to: • Communications with system components that are authorized to provide publicly accessible services, protocols, and ports. • Stateful responses to communications initiated by system components in a trusted network. • All other traffic is denied. link 7
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 10.1 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_10.1 Secure Mail And Messaging Systems Secure Mail And Messaging Systems-10.1 n/a Implement secure mail and messaging systems, including those used by bank???s partners & vendors, that include measures to prevent email spoofing, identical mail domains, protection of attachments, malicious links etc 17
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 10.2 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_10.2 Secure Mail And Messaging Systems Secure Mail And Messaging Systems-10.2 n/a Document and implement emailserver specific controls 17
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 13.3 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_13.3 Advanced Real-Timethreat Defenceand Management Advanced Real-Timethreat Defenceand Management-13.3 n/a Consider implementing whitelisting of internet websites/systems. 15
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 13.4 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_13.4 Advanced Real-Timethreat Defenceand Management Advanced Real-Timethreat Defenceand Management-13.4 n/a Consider implementingsecure web gateways with capability to deep scan network packets including secure (HTTPS, etc.) traffic passing through the web/internet gateway 44
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 15.1 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_15.1 Data Leak Prevention Strategy Data Leak Prevention Strategy-15.1 n/a Develop a comprehensive data loss/leakage prevention strategy to safeguard sensitive (including confidential)business and customer data/information. 8
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 4.10 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_4.10 Network Management And Security Perimeter Protection And Detection-4.10 n/a Boundary defences should be multi-layered with properly configured firewalls, proxies, DMZ perimeter networks, and network--???based IPS and IDS. Mechanism to filter both inbound and outbound traffic to be put in place. 12
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 4.3 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_4.3 Network Management And Security Network Device Configuration Management-4.3 n/a Ensure that all the network devices are configured appropriately and periodically assess whether the configurations are appropriate to the desired level of network security. 17
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 4.7 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_4.7 Network Management And Security Anomaly Detection-4.7 n/a Put in place mechanism to detect and remedy any unusual activities in systems, servers, network devices and endpoints. 14
RBI_ITF_NBFC_v2017 5 RBI_ITF_NBFC_v2017_5 RBI IT Framework 5 IS Audit Policy for Information System Audit (IS Audit)-5 n/a The objective of the IS Audit is to provide an insight on the effectiveness of controls that are in place to ensure confidentiality, integrity and availability of the organization???s IT infrastructure. IS Audit shall identify risks and methods to mitigate risk arising out of IT infrastructure such as server architecture, local and wide area networks, physical and information security, telecommunications etc. link 14
RMiT_v1.0 10.33 RMiT_v1.0_10.33 RMiT 10.33 Network Resilience Network Resilience - 10.33 Shared n/a A financial institution must design a reliable, scalable and secure enterprise network that is able to support its business activities, including future growth plans. link 28
RMiT_v1.0 Appendix_5.7 RMiT_v1.0_Appendix_5.7 RMiT Appendix 5.7 Control Measures on Cybersecurity Control Measures on Cybersecurity - Appendix 5.7 Customer n/a Ensure overall network security controls are implemented including the following: (a) dedicated firewalls at all segments. All external-facing firewalls must be deployed on High Availability (HA) configuration and “fail-close” mode activated. Deploy different brand name/model for two firewalls located in sequence within the same network path; (b) IPS at all critical network segments with the capability to inspect and monitor encrypted network traffic; (c) web and email filtering systems such as web-proxy, spam filter and anti-spoofing controls; (d) endpoint protection solution to detect and remove security threats including viruses and malicious software; (e) solution to mitigate advanced persistent threats including zero-day and signatureless malware; and (f) capture the full network packets to rebuild relevant network sessions to aid forensics in the event of incidents. link 27
SOC_2 CC6.1 SOC_2_CC6.1 SOC 2 Type 2 CC6.1 Logical and Physical Access Controls Logical access security software, infrastructure, and architectures Shared The customer is responsible for implementing this recommendation. The following points of focus, specifically related to all engagements using the trust services criteria, highlight important characteristics relating to this criterion: • Identifies and Manages the Inventory of Information Assets — The entity identifies, Page 29 TSP Ref. # TRUST SERVICES CRITERIA AND POINTS OF FOCUS inventories, classifies, and manages information assets. • Restricts Logical Access — Logical access to information assets, including hardware, data (at-rest, during processing, or in transmission), software, administrative authorities, mobile devices, output, and offline system components is restricted through the use of access control software and rule sets. • Identifies and Authenticates Users — Persons, infrastructure, and software are identified and authenticated prior to accessing information assets, whether locally or remotely. • Considers Network Segmentation — Network segmentation permits unrelated portions of the entity's information system to be isolated from each other. • Manages Points of Access — Points of access by outside entities and the types of data that flow through the points of access are identified, inventoried, and managed. The types of individuals and systems using each point of access are identified, documented, and managed. • Restricts Access to Information Assets — Combinations of data classification, separate data structures, port restrictions, access protocol restrictions, user identification, and digital certificates are used to establish access-control rules for information assets. • Manages Identification and Authentication — Identification and authentication requirements are established, documented, and managed for individuals and systems accessing entity information, infrastructure, and software. • Manages Credentials for Infrastructure and Software — New internal and external infrastructure and software are registered, authorized, and documented prior to being granted access credentials and implemented on the network or access point. Credentials are removed and access is disabled when access is no longer required or the infrastructure and software are no longer in use. • Uses Encryption to Protect Data — The entity uses encryption to supplement other measures used to protect data at rest, when such protections are deemed appropriate based on assessed risk. • Protects Encryption Keys — Processes are in place to protect encryption keys during generation, storage, use, and destruction 80
SOC_2 CC6.6 SOC_2_CC6.6 SOC 2 Type 2 CC6.6 Logical and Physical Access Controls Security measures against threats outside system boundaries Shared The customer is responsible for implementing this recommendation. • Restricts Access — The types of activities that can occur through a communication channel (for example, FTP site, router port) are restricted. • Protects Identification and Authentication Credentials — Identification and authentication credentials are protected during transmission outside its system boundaries. • Requires Additional Authentication or Credentials — Additional authentication information or credentials are required when accessing the system from outside its boundaries. • Implements Boundary Protection Systems — Boundary protection systems (for example, firewalls, demilitarized zones, and intrusion detection systems) are implemented to protect external access points from attempts and unauthorized access and are monitored to detect such attempts 41
SOC_2 CC6.7 SOC_2_CC6.7 SOC 2 Type 2 CC6.7 Logical and Physical Access Controls Restrict the movement of information to authorized users Shared The customer is responsible for implementing this recommendation. • Restricts the Ability to Perform Transmission — Data loss prevention processes and technologies are used to restrict ability to authorize and execute transmission, movement, and removal of information. • Uses Encryption Technologies or Secure Communication Channels to Protect Data — Encryption technologies or secured communication channels are used to protect transmission of data and other communications beyond connectivity access points. • Protects Removal Media — Encryption technologies and physical asset protections are used for removable media (such as USB drives and backup tapes), as appropriate. • Protects Mobile Devices — Processes are in place to protect mobile devices (such as laptops, smart phones, and tablets) that serve as information assets 30
SWIFT_CSCF_v2021 1.1 SWIFT_CSCF_v2021_1.1 SWIFT CSCF v2021 1.1 SWIFT Environment Protection SWIFT Environment Protection n/a Ensure the protection of the user's local SWIFT infrastructure from potentially compromised elements of the general IT environment and external environment. link 30
SWIFT_CSCF_v2022 1.1 SWIFT_CSCF_v2022_1.1 SWIFT CSCF v2022 1.1 1. Restrict Internet Access & Protect Critical Systems from General IT Environment Ensure the protection of the user's local SWIFT infrastructure from potentially compromised elements of the general IT environment and external environment. Shared n/a A separated secure zone safeguards the user's SWIFT infrastructure from compromises and attacks on the broader enterprise and external environments. link 22
SWIFT_CSCF_v2022 1.5A SWIFT_CSCF_v2022_1.5A SWIFT CSCF v2022 1.5A 1. Restrict Internet Access & Protect Critical Systems from General IT Environment Ensure the protection of the customer’s connectivity infrastructure from external environment and potentially compromised elements of the general IT environment. Shared n/a A separated secure zone safeguards the customer's infrastructure used for external connectivity from external environments and compromises or attacks on the broader enterprise environment. link 26
UK_NCSC_CSP 11 UK_NCSC_CSP_11 UK NCSC CSP 11 External interface protection External interface protection Shared n/a All external or less trusted interfaces of the service should be identified and appropriately defended. link 8
History
Date/Time (UTC ymd) (i) Change type Change detail
2021-01-05 16:06:49 change Major (2.0.1 > 3.0.0)
Initiatives
usage
Initiative DisplayName Initiative Id Initiative Category State Type
[Deprecated]: DoD Impact Level 4 8d792a84-723c-4d92-a3c3-e4ed16a2d133 Regulatory Compliance Deprecated BuiltIn
[Preview]: CMMC 2.0 Level 2 4e50fd13-098b-3206-61d6-d1d78205cb45 Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
[Preview]: Reserve Bank of India - IT Framework for Banks d0d5578d-cc08-2b22-31e3-f525374f235a Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
[Preview]: Reserve Bank of India - IT Framework for NBFC 7f89f09c-48c1-f28d-1bd5-84f3fb22f86c Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
[Preview]: SWIFT CSP-CSCF v2020 3e0c67fc-8c7c-406c-89bd-6b6bdc986a22 Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
[Preview]: SWIFT CSP-CSCF v2021 abf84fac-f817-a70c-14b5-47eec767458a Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
Azure Security Benchmark 1f3afdf9-d0c9-4c3d-847f-89da613e70a8 Security Center GA BuiltIn
Canada Federal PBMM 4c4a5f27-de81-430b-b4e5-9cbd50595a87 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
CMMC Level 3 b5629c75-5c77-4422-87b9-2509e680f8de Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP High d5264498-16f4-418a-b659-fa7ef418175f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP Moderate e95f5a9f-57ad-4d03-bb0b-b1d16db93693 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
HITRUST/HIPAA a169a624-5599-4385-a696-c8d643089fab Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
IRS1075 September 2016 105e0327-6175-4eb2-9af4-1fba43bdb39d Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
ISO 27001:2013 89c6cddc-1c73-4ac1-b19c-54d1a15a42f2 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
New Zealand ISM Restricted d1a462af-7e6d-4901-98ac-61570b4ed22a Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
New Zealand ISM Restricted v3.5 93d2179e-3068-c82f-2428-d614ae836a04 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-171 Rev. 2 03055927-78bd-4236-86c0-f36125a10dc9 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 cf25b9c1-bd23-4eb6-bd2c-f4f3ac644a5f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 179d1daa-458f-4e47-8086-2a68d0d6c38f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
PCI DSS v4 c676748e-3af9-4e22-bc28-50feed564afb Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
PCI v3.2.1:2018 496eeda9-8f2f-4d5e-8dfd-204f0a92ed41 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
RMIT Malaysia 97a6d4f1-3bed-4cf4-ac5b-0e444c0408d6 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
SOC 2 Type 2 4054785f-702b-4a98-9215-009cbd58b141 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
SWIFT CSP-CSCF v2022 7bc7cd6c-4114-ff31-3cac-59be3157596d Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
UK OFFICIAL and UK NHS 3937f550-eedd-4639-9c5e-294358be442e Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
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