last sync: 2023-Feb-06 18:40:05 UTC

Azure Policy definition

Windows machines should meet requirements of the Azure compute security baseline

Name Windows machines should meet requirements of the Azure compute security baseline
Azure Portal
Id 72650e9f-97bc-4b2a-ab5f-9781a9fcecbc
Version 2.0.0
details on versioning
Category Guest Configuration
Microsoft docs
Description Requires that prerequisites are deployed to the policy assignment scope. For details, visit https://aka.ms/gcpol. Machines are non-compliant if the machine is not configured correctly for one of the recommendations in the Azure compute security baseline.
Mode Indexed
Type BuiltIn
Preview FALSE
Deprecated FALSE
Effect Default
AuditIfNotExists
Allowed
AuditIfNotExists, Disabled
RBAC
Role(s)
none
Rule
Aliases
IF (7)
Alias Namespace ResourceType DefaultPath Modifiable
Microsoft.Compute/imageOffer Microsoft.Compute
Microsoft.Compute
Microsoft.Compute
virtualMachines
virtualMachineScaleSets
disks
properties.storageProfile.imageReference.offer
properties.virtualMachineProfile.storageProfile.imageReference.offer
properties.creationData.imageReference.id
false
false
false
Microsoft.Compute/imagePublisher Microsoft.Compute
Microsoft.Compute
Microsoft.Compute
virtualMachines
virtualMachineScaleSets
disks
properties.storageProfile.imageReference.publisher
properties.virtualMachineProfile.storageProfile.imageReference.publisher
properties.creationData.imageReference.id
false
false
false
Microsoft.Compute/imageSKU Microsoft.Compute
Microsoft.Compute
Microsoft.Compute
virtualMachines
virtualMachineScaleSets
disks
properties.storageProfile.imageReference.sku
properties.virtualMachineProfile.storageProfile.imageReference.sku
properties.creationData.imageReference.id
false
false
false
Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/osProfile.windowsConfiguration Microsoft.Compute virtualMachines properties.osProfile.windowsConfiguration true
Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/storageProfile.osDisk.osType Microsoft.Compute virtualMachines properties.storageProfile.osDisk.osType true
Microsoft.ConnectedVMwarevSphere/virtualMachines/osProfile.osType Microsoft.ConnectedVMwarevSphere virtualmachines properties.osProfile.osType false
Microsoft.HybridCompute/imageOffer Microsoft.HybridCompute machines properties.osName false
THEN-ExistenceCondition (1)
Alias Namespace ResourceType DefaultPath Modifiable
Microsoft.GuestConfiguration/guestConfigurationAssignments/complianceStatus Microsoft.GuestConfiguration guestConfigurationAssignments properties.complianceStatus false
Rule
ResourceTypes
IF (3)
Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines
Microsoft.ConnectedVMwarevSphere/virtualMachines
Microsoft.HybridCompute/machines
Compliance The following 13 compliance controls are associated with this Policy definition 'Windows machines should meet requirements of the Azure compute security baseline' (72650e9f-97bc-4b2a-ab5f-9781a9fcecbc)
Control Domain Control Name MetadataId Category Title Owner Requirements Description Info Policy#
Azure_Security_Benchmark_v3.0 PV-4 Azure_Security_Benchmark_v3.0_PV-4 Azure Security Benchmark PV-4 Posture and Vulnerability Management Audit and enforce secure configurations for compute resources Shared **Security Principle:** Continuously monitor and alert when there is a deviation from the defined configuration baseline in your compute resources. Enforce the desired configuration according to the baseline configuration by denying the non-compliant configuration or deploy a configuration in compute resources. **Azure Guidance:** Use Microsoft Defender for Cloud and Azure Policy guest configuration agent to regularly assess and remediate configuration deviations on your Azure compute resources, including VMs, containers, and others. In addition, you can use Azure Resource Manager templates, custom operating system images, or Azure Automation State Configuration to maintain the security configuration of the operating system. Microsoft VM templates in conjunction with Azure Automation State Configuration can assist in meeting and maintaining security requirements. Note: Azure Marketplace VM images published by Microsoft are managed and maintained by Microsoft. **Implementation and additional context:** How to implement Microsoft Defender for Cloud vulnerability assessment recommendations: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/security-center/security-center-vulnerability-assessment-recommendations How to create an Azure virtual machine from an ARM template: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/virtual-machines/windows/ps-template Azure Automation State Configuration overview: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/automation/automation-dsc-overview Create a Windows virtual machine in the Azure portal: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/virtual-machines/windows/quick-create-portal Container security in Microsoft Defender for Cloud: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/security-center/container-security n/a link 10
CMMC_2.0_L2 CM.L2-3.4.1 CMMC_2.0_L2_CM.L2-3.4.1 404 not found n/a n/a 25
CMMC_2.0_L2 CM.L2-3.4.2 CMMC_2.0_L2_CM.L2-3.4.2 404 not found n/a n/a 27
FedRAMP_High_R4 CM-6 FedRAMP_High_R4_CM-6 FedRAMP High CM-6 Configuration Management Configuration Settings Shared n/a The organization: a. Establishes and documents configuration settings for information technology products employed within the information system using [Assignment: organization-defined security configuration checklists] that reflect the most restrictive mode consistent with operational requirements; b. Implements the configuration settings; c. Identifies, documents, and approves any deviations from established configuration settings for [Assignment: organization-defined information system components] based on [Assignment: organization-defined operational requirements]; and d. Monitors and controls changes to the configuration settings in accordance with organizational policies and procedures. Supplemental Guidance: Configuration settings are the set of parameters that can be changed in hardware, software, or firmware components of the information system that affect the security posture and/or functionality of the system. Information technology products for which security- related configuration settings can be defined include, for example, mainframe computers, servers (e.g., database, electronic mail, authentication, web, proxy, file, domain name), workstations, input/output devices (e.g., scanners, copiers, and printers), network components (e.g., firewalls, routers, gateways, voice and data switches, wireless access points, network appliances, sensors), operating systems, middleware, and applications. Security-related parameters are those parameters impacting the security state of information systems including the parameters required to satisfy other security control requirements. Security-related parameters include, for example: (i) registry settings; (ii) account, file, directory permission settings; and (iii) settings for functions, ports, protocols, services, and remote connections. Organizations establish organization-wide configuration settings and subsequently derive specific settings for information systems. The established settings become part of the systems configuration baseline. Common secure configurations (also referred to as security configuration checklists, lockdown and hardening guides, security reference guides, security technical implementation guides) provide recognized, standardized, and established benchmarks that stipulate secure configuration settings for specific information technology platforms/products and instructions for configuring those information system components to meet operational requirements. Common secure configurations can be developed by a variety of organizations including, for example, information technology product developers, manufacturers, vendors, consortia, academia, industry, federal agencies, and other organizations in the public and private sectors. Common secure configurations include the United States Government Configuration Baseline (USGCB) which affects the implementation of CM-6 and other controls such as AC-19 and CM-7. The Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP) and the defined standards within the protocol (e.g., Common Configuration Enumeration) provide an effective method to uniquely identify, track, and control configuration settings. OMB establishes federal policy on configuration requirements for federal information systems. Related controls: AC-19, CM-2, CM-3, CM-7, SI-4. References: OMB Memoranda 07-11, 07-18, 08-22; NIST Special Publications 800-70, 800-128; Web: http://nvd.nist.gov, http://checklists.nist.gov, http://www.nsa.gov. link 23
FedRAMP_Moderate_R4 CM-6 FedRAMP_Moderate_R4_CM-6 FedRAMP Moderate CM-6 Configuration Management Configuration Settings Shared n/a The organization: a. Establishes and documents configuration settings for information technology products employed within the information system using [Assignment: organization-defined security configuration checklists] that reflect the most restrictive mode consistent with operational requirements; b. Implements the configuration settings; c. Identifies, documents, and approves any deviations from established configuration settings for [Assignment: organization-defined information system components] based on [Assignment: organization-defined operational requirements]; and d. Monitors and controls changes to the configuration settings in accordance with organizational policies and procedures. Supplemental Guidance: Configuration settings are the set of parameters that can be changed in hardware, software, or firmware components of the information system that affect the security posture and/or functionality of the system. Information technology products for which security- related configuration settings can be defined include, for example, mainframe computers, servers (e.g., database, electronic mail, authentication, web, proxy, file, domain name), workstations, input/output devices (e.g., scanners, copiers, and printers), network components (e.g., firewalls, routers, gateways, voice and data switches, wireless access points, network appliances, sensors), operating systems, middleware, and applications. Security-related parameters are those parameters impacting the security state of information systems including the parameters required to satisfy other security control requirements. Security-related parameters include, for example: (i) registry settings; (ii) account, file, directory permission settings; and (iii) settings for functions, ports, protocols, services, and remote connections. Organizations establish organization-wide configuration settings and subsequently derive specific settings for information systems. The established settings become part of the systems configuration baseline. Common secure configurations (also referred to as security configuration checklists, lockdown and hardening guides, security reference guides, security technical implementation guides) provide recognized, standardized, and established benchmarks that stipulate secure configuration settings for specific information technology platforms/products and instructions for configuring those information system components to meet operational requirements. Common secure configurations can be developed by a variety of organizations including, for example, information technology product developers, manufacturers, vendors, consortia, academia, industry, federal agencies, and other organizations in the public and private sectors. Common secure configurations include the United States Government Configuration Baseline (USGCB) which affects the implementation of CM-6 and other controls such as AC-19 and CM-7. The Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP) and the defined standards within the protocol (e.g., Common Configuration Enumeration) provide an effective method to uniquely identify, track, and control configuration settings. OMB establishes federal policy on configuration requirements for federal information systems. Related controls: AC-19, CM-2, CM-3, CM-7, SI-4. References: OMB Memoranda 07-11, 07-18, 08-22; NIST Special Publications 800-70, 800-128; Web: http://nvd.nist.gov, http://checklists.nist.gov, http://www.nsa.gov. link 23
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .4.1 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.4.1 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.4.1 Configuration Management Establish and maintain baseline configurations and inventories of organizational systems (including hardware, software, firmware, and documentation) throughout the respective system development life cycles. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Baseline configurations are documented, formally reviewed, and agreed-upon specifications for systems or configuration items within those systems. Baseline configurations serve as a basis for future builds, releases, and changes to systems. Baseline configurations include information about system components (e.g., standard software packages installed on workstations, notebook computers, servers, network components, or mobile devices; current version numbers and update and patch information on operating systems and applications; and configuration settings and parameters), network topology, and the logical placement of those components within the system architecture. Baseline configurations of systems also reflect the current enterprise architecture. Maintaining effective baseline configurations requires creating new baselines as organizational systems change over time. Baseline configuration maintenance includes reviewing and updating the baseline configuration when changes are made based on security risks and deviations from the established baseline configuration. Organizations can implement centralized system component inventories that include components from multiple organizational systems. In such situations, organizations ensure that the resulting inventories include system-specific information required for proper component accountability (e.g., system association, system owner). Information deemed necessary for effective accountability of system components includes hardware inventory specifications, software license information, software version numbers, component owners, and for networked components or devices, machine names and network addresses. Inventory specifications include manufacturer, device type, model, serial number, and physical location. [SP 800-128] provides guidance on security-focused configuration management. link 31
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .4.2 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.4.2 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.4.2 Configuration Management Establish and enforce security configuration settings for information technology products employed in organizational systems. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Configuration settings are the set of parameters that can be changed in hardware, software, or firmware components of the system that affect the security posture or functionality of the system. Information technology products for which security-related configuration settings can be defined include mainframe computers, servers, workstations, input and output devices (e.g., scanners, copiers, and printers), network components (e.g., firewalls, routers, gateways, voice and data switches, wireless access points, network appliances, sensors), operating systems, middleware, and applications. Security parameters are those parameters impacting the security state of systems including the parameters required to satisfy other security requirements. Security parameters include: registry settings; account, file, directory permission settings; and settings for functions, ports, protocols, and remote connections. Organizations establish organization-wide configuration settings and subsequently derive specific configuration settings for systems. The established settings become part of the systems configuration baseline. Common secure configurations (also referred to as security configuration checklists, lockdown and hardening guides, security reference guides, security technical implementation guides) provide recognized, standardized, and established benchmarks that stipulate secure configuration settings for specific information technology platforms/products and instructions for configuring those system components to meet operational requirements. Common secure configurations can be developed by a variety of organizations including information technology product developers, manufacturers, vendors, consortia, academia, industry, federal agencies, and other organizations in the public and private sectors. [SP 800-70] and [SP 800-128] provide guidance on security configuration settings. link 25
NIST_SP_800-53_R4 CM-6 NIST_SP_800-53_R4_CM-6 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 CM-6 Configuration Management Configuration Settings Shared n/a The organization: a. Establishes and documents configuration settings for information technology products employed within the information system using [Assignment: organization-defined security configuration checklists] that reflect the most restrictive mode consistent with operational requirements; b. Implements the configuration settings; c. Identifies, documents, and approves any deviations from established configuration settings for [Assignment: organization-defined information system components] based on [Assignment: organization-defined operational requirements]; and d. Monitors and controls changes to the configuration settings in accordance with organizational policies and procedures. Supplemental Guidance: Configuration settings are the set of parameters that can be changed in hardware, software, or firmware components of the information system that affect the security posture and/or functionality of the system. Information technology products for which security- related configuration settings can be defined include, for example, mainframe computers, servers (e.g., database, electronic mail, authentication, web, proxy, file, domain name), workstations, input/output devices (e.g., scanners, copiers, and printers), network components (e.g., firewalls, routers, gateways, voice and data switches, wireless access points, network appliances, sensors), operating systems, middleware, and applications. Security-related parameters are those parameters impacting the security state of information systems including the parameters required to satisfy other security control requirements. Security-related parameters include, for example: (i) registry settings; (ii) account, file, directory permission settings; and (iii) settings for functions, ports, protocols, services, and remote connections. Organizations establish organization-wide configuration settings and subsequently derive specific settings for information systems. The established settings become part of the systems configuration baseline. Common secure configurations (also referred to as security configuration checklists, lockdown and hardening guides, security reference guides, security technical implementation guides) provide recognized, standardized, and established benchmarks that stipulate secure configuration settings for specific information technology platforms/products and instructions for configuring those information system components to meet operational requirements. Common secure configurations can be developed by a variety of organizations including, for example, information technology product developers, manufacturers, vendors, consortia, academia, industry, federal agencies, and other organizations in the public and private sectors. Common secure configurations include the United States Government Configuration Baseline (USGCB) which affects the implementation of CM-6 and other controls such as AC-19 and CM-7. The Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP) and the defined standards within the protocol (e.g., Common Configuration Enumeration) provide an effective method to uniquely identify, track, and control configuration settings. OMB establishes federal policy on configuration requirements for federal information systems. Related controls: AC-19, CM-2, CM-3, CM-7, SI-4. References: OMB Memoranda 07-11, 07-18, 08-22; NIST Special Publications 800-70, 800-128; Web: http://nvd.nist.gov, http://checklists.nist.gov, http://www.nsa.gov. link 23
NIST_SP_800-53_R5 CM-6 NIST_SP_800-53_R5_CM-6 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 CM-6 Configuration Management Configuration Settings Shared n/a a. Establish and document configuration settings for components employed within the system that reflect the most restrictive mode consistent with operational requirements using [Assignment: organization-defined common secure configurations]; b. Implement the configuration settings; c. Identify, document, and approve any deviations from established configuration settings for [Assignment: organization-defined system components] based on [Assignment: organization-defined operational requirements]; and d. Monitor and control changes to the configuration settings in accordance with organizational policies and procedures. link 23
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 13.1 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_13.1 Advanced Real-Timethreat Defenceand Management Advanced Real-Timethreat Defenceand Management-13.1 n/a Build a robust defence against the installation, spread, and execution of malicious code at multiple points in the enterprise. 27
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 17.1 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_17.1 Audit Log Settings Audit Log Settings-17.1 n/a Implement and periodically validate settings for capturing of appropriate logs/audit trails of each device, system software and application software , ensuring that logs include minimum information to uniquely identify the log for example by including a date, timestamp, source addresses, destination addresses, and various other useful elements of each packet and/or event and/or transaction. 15
SOC_2 CC6.8 SOC_2_CC6.8 SOC 2 Type 2 CC6.8 Logical and Physical Access Controls Prevent or detect against unauthorized or malicious software Shared The customer is responsible for implementing this recommendation. Restricts Application and Software Installation — The ability to install applications and software is restricted to authorized individuals. • Detects Unauthorized Changes to Software and Configuration Parameters — Processes are in place to detect changes to software and configuration parameters that may be indicative of unauthorized or malicious software. • Uses a Defined Change Control Process — A management-defined change control process is used for the implementation of software. • Uses Antivirus and Anti-Malware Software — Antivirus and anti-malware software is implemented and maintained to provide for the interception or detection and remediation of malware. • Scans Information Assets from Outside the Entity for Malware and Other Unauthorized Software — Procedures are in place to scan information assets that have been transferred or returned to the entity’s custody for malware and other unauthorized software and to remove any items detected prior to its implementation on the network. 54
SOC_2 CC8.1 SOC_2_CC8.1 SOC 2 Type 2 CC8.1 Change Management Changes to infrastructure, data, and software Shared The customer is responsible for implementing this recommendation. Manages Changes Throughout the System Life Cycle — A process for managing system changes throughout the life cycle of the system and its components (infrastructure, data, software, and procedures) is used to support system availability and processing integrity. • Authorizes Changes — A process is in place to authorize system changes prior to development. • Designs and Develops Changes — A process is in place to design and develop system changes. • Documents Changes — A process is in place to document system changes to support ongoing maintenance of the system and to support system users in performing their responsibilities. • Tracks System Changes — A process is in place to track system changes prior to implementation. • Configures Software — A process is in place to select and implement the configuration parameters used to control the functionality of software. • Tests System Changes — A process is in place to test system changes prior to implementation. • Approves System Changes — A process is in place to approve system changes prior to implementation. • Deploys System Changes — A process is in place to implement system changes. • Identifies and Evaluates System Changes — Objectives affected by system changes are identified and the ability of the modified system to meet the objectives is evaluated throughout the system development life cycle. • Identifies Changes in Infrastructure, Data, Software, and Procedures Required to Remediate Incidents — Changes in infrastructure, data, software, and procedures required to remediate incidents to continue to meet objectives are identified and the change process is initiated upon identification. • Creates Baseline Configuration of IT Technology — A baseline configuration of IT and control systems is created and maintained. • Provides for Changes Necessary in Emergency Situations — A process is in place for authorizing, designing, testing, approving, and implementing changes necessary in emergency situations (that is, changes that need to be implemented in an urgent time frame). Additional points of focus that apply only in an engagement using the trust services criteria for confidentiality: • Protects Confidential Information — The entity protects confidential information during system design, development, testing, implementation, and change processes to meet the entity’s objectives related to confidentiality. Additional points of focus that apply only in an engagement using the trust services criteria for privacy: • Protects Personal Information — The entity protects personal information during system design, development, testing, implementation, and change processes to meet the entity’s objectives related to privacy. 53
History
Date/Time (UTC ymd) (i) Change type Change detail
2022-01-28 17:51:01 change Major (1.0.1 > 2.0.0)
2021-10-19 19:10:32 change Version remains equal, old suffix: preview (1.0.1-preview > 1.0.1)
2021-05-11 14:06:18 change Patch, suffix remains equal (1.0.0-preview > 1.0.1-preview)
2021-01-22 09:14:53 add 72650e9f-97bc-4b2a-ab5f-9781a9fcecbc
Initiatives
usage
Initiative DisplayName Initiative Id Initiative Category State Type
[Preview]: CMMC 2.0 Level 2 4e50fd13-098b-3206-61d6-d1d78205cb45 Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
[Preview]: Reserve Bank of India - IT Framework for Banks d0d5578d-cc08-2b22-31e3-f525374f235a Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
Azure Security Benchmark 1f3afdf9-d0c9-4c3d-847f-89da613e70a8 Security Center GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP High d5264498-16f4-418a-b659-fa7ef418175f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP Moderate e95f5a9f-57ad-4d03-bb0b-b1d16db93693 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-171 Rev. 2 03055927-78bd-4236-86c0-f36125a10dc9 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 cf25b9c1-bd23-4eb6-bd2c-f4f3ac644a5f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 179d1daa-458f-4e47-8086-2a68d0d6c38f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
SOC 2 Type 2 4054785f-702b-4a98-9215-009cbd58b141 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
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changes

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