last sync: 2024-Jul-17 18:20:29 UTC

Refresh authenticators | Regulatory Compliance - Operational

Azure BuiltIn Policy definition

Source Azure Portal
Display name Refresh authenticators
Id 3ae68d9a-5696-8c32-62d3-c6f9c52e437c
Version 1.1.0
Details on versioning
Category Regulatory Compliance
Microsoft Learn
Description CMA_0425 - Refresh authenticators
Additional metadata Name/Id: CMA_0425 / CMA_0425
Category: Operational
Title: Refresh authenticators
Ownership: Customer
Description: Microsoft recommends that your organization refresh authenticators regularly. Your organization should consider creating and maintaining identification and authentication policies and standard operating procedures for refreshing the authenticators used to access information systems.
Requirements: The customer is responsible for implementing this recommendation.
Mode All
Type BuiltIn
Preview False
Deprecated False
Effect Default
Manual
Allowed
Manual, Disabled
RBAC role(s) none
Rule aliases none
Rule resource types IF (1)
Microsoft.Resources/subscriptions
Compliance
The following 24 compliance controls are associated with this Policy definition 'Refresh authenticators' (3ae68d9a-5696-8c32-62d3-c6f9c52e437c)
Control Domain Control Name MetadataId Category Title Owner Requirements Description Info Policy#
FedRAMP_High_R4 IA-5 FedRAMP_High_R4_IA-5 FedRAMP High IA-5 Identification And Authentication Authenticator Management Shared n/a The organization manages information system authenticators by: a. Verifying, as part of the initial authenticator distribution, the identity of the individual, group, role, or device receiving the authenticator; b. Establishing initial authenticator content for authenticators defined by the organization; c. Ensuring that authenticators have sufficient strength of mechanism for their intended use; d. Establishing and implementing administrative procedures for initial authenticator distribution, for lost/compromised or damaged authenticators, and for revoking authenticators; e. Changing default content of authenticators prior to information system installation; f. Establishing minimum and maximum lifetime restrictions and reuse conditions for authenticators; g. Changing/refreshing authenticators [Assignment: organization-defined time period by authenticator type]; h. Protecting authenticator content from unauthorized disclosure and modification; i. Requiring individuals to take, and having devices implement, specific security safeguards to protect authenticators; and j. Changing authenticators for group/role accounts when membership to those accounts changes. Supplemental Guidance: Individual authenticators include, for example, passwords, tokens, biometrics, PKI certificates, and key cards. Initial authenticator content is the actual content (e.g., the initial password) as opposed to requirements about authenticator content (e.g., minimum password length). In many cases, developers ship information system components with factory default authentication credentials to allow for initial installation and configuration. Default authentication credentials are often well known, easily discoverable, and present a significant security risk. The requirement to protect individual authenticators may be implemented via control PL-4 or PS-6 for authenticators in the possession of individuals and by controls AC-3, AC-6, and SC-28 for authenticators stored within organizational information systems (e.g., passwords stored in hashed or encrypted formats, files containing encrypted or hashed passwords accessible with administrator privileges). Information systems support individual authenticator management by organization-defined settings and restrictions for various authenticator characteristics including, for example, minimum password length, password composition, validation time window for time synchronous one-time tokens, and number of allowed rejections during the verification stage of biometric authentication. Specific actions that can be taken to safeguard authenticators include, for example, maintaining possession of individual authenticators, not loaning or sharing individual authenticators with others, and reporting lost, stolen, or compromised authenticators immediately. Authenticator management includes issuing and revoking, when no longer needed, authenticators for temporary access such as that required for remote maintenance. Device authenticators include, for example, certificates and passwords. Related controls: AC-2, AC-3, AC-6, CM-6, IA-2, IA-4, IA-8, PL-4, PS-5, PS-6, SC-12, SC-13, SC-17, SC-28. References: OMB Memoranda 04-04, 11-11; FIPS Publication 201; NIST Special Publications 800-73, 800-63, 800-76, 800-78; FICAM Roadmap and Implementation Guidance link 18
FedRAMP_Moderate_R4 IA-5 FedRAMP_Moderate_R4_IA-5 FedRAMP Moderate IA-5 Identification And Authentication Authenticator Management Shared n/a The organization manages information system authenticators by: a. Verifying, as part of the initial authenticator distribution, the identity of the individual, group, role, or device receiving the authenticator; b. Establishing initial authenticator content for authenticators defined by the organization; c. Ensuring that authenticators have sufficient strength of mechanism for their intended use; d. Establishing and implementing administrative procedures for initial authenticator distribution, for lost/compromised or damaged authenticators, and for revoking authenticators; e. Changing default content of authenticators prior to information system installation; f. Establishing minimum and maximum lifetime restrictions and reuse conditions for authenticators; g. Changing/refreshing authenticators [Assignment: organization-defined time period by authenticator type]; h. Protecting authenticator content from unauthorized disclosure and modification; i. Requiring individuals to take, and having devices implement, specific security safeguards to protect authenticators; and j. Changing authenticators for group/role accounts when membership to those accounts changes. Supplemental Guidance: Individual authenticators include, for example, passwords, tokens, biometrics, PKI certificates, and key cards. Initial authenticator content is the actual content (e.g., the initial password) as opposed to requirements about authenticator content (e.g., minimum password length). In many cases, developers ship information system components with factory default authentication credentials to allow for initial installation and configuration. Default authentication credentials are often well known, easily discoverable, and present a significant security risk. The requirement to protect individual authenticators may be implemented via control PL-4 or PS-6 for authenticators in the possession of individuals and by controls AC-3, AC-6, and SC-28 for authenticators stored within organizational information systems (e.g., passwords stored in hashed or encrypted formats, files containing encrypted or hashed passwords accessible with administrator privileges). Information systems support individual authenticator management by organization-defined settings and restrictions for various authenticator characteristics including, for example, minimum password length, password composition, validation time window for time synchronous one-time tokens, and number of allowed rejections during the verification stage of biometric authentication. Specific actions that can be taken to safeguard authenticators include, for example, maintaining possession of individual authenticators, not loaning or sharing individual authenticators with others, and reporting lost, stolen, or compromised authenticators immediately. Authenticator management includes issuing and revoking, when no longer needed, authenticators for temporary access such as that required for remote maintenance. Device authenticators include, for example, certificates and passwords. Related controls: AC-2, AC-3, AC-6, CM-6, IA-2, IA-4, IA-8, PL-4, PS-5, PS-6, SC-12, SC-13, SC-17, SC-28. References: OMB Memoranda 04-04, 11-11; FIPS Publication 201; NIST Special Publications 800-73, 800-63, 800-76, 800-78; FICAM Roadmap and Implementation Guidance link 18
hipaa 1003.01d1System.3-01.d hipaa-1003.01d1System.3-01.d 1003.01d1System.3-01.d 10 Password Management 1003.01d1System.3-01.d 01.02 Authorized Access to Information Systems Shared n/a User identities are verified prior to performing password resets. 3
hipaa 1004.01d1System.8913-01.d hipaa-1004.01d1System.8913-01.d 1004.01d1System.8913-01.d 10 Password Management 1004.01d1System.8913-01.d 01.02 Authorized Access to Information Systems Shared n/a The organization maintains a list of commonly-used, expected, or compromised passwords, and updates the list (i) at least every 180 days and (ii) when organizational passwords are suspected to have been compromised (either directly or indirectly); allows users to select long passwords and passphrases, including spaces and all printable characters; employs automated tools to assist the user in selecting strong passwords and authenticators; and verifies, when users create or update passwords, that the passwords are not found on the organization-defined list of commonly-used, expected, or compromised passwords. 8
hipaa 1009.01d2System.4-01.d hipaa-1009.01d2System.4-01.d 1009.01d2System.4-01.d 10 Password Management 1009.01d2System.4-01.d 01.02 Authorized Access to Information Systems Shared n/a Temporary passwords are unique and not guessable. 4
hipaa 1014.01d1System.12-01.d hipaa-1014.01d1System.12-01.d 1014.01d1System.12-01.d 10 Password Management 1014.01d1System.12-01.d 01.02 Authorized Access to Information Systems Shared n/a The organization avoids the use of third-parties or unprotected (clear text) electronic mail messages for the dissemination of passwords. 11
hipaa 1022.01d1System.15-01.d hipaa-1022.01d1System.15-01.d 1022.01d1System.15-01.d 10 Password Management 1022.01d1System.15-01.d 01.02 Authorized Access to Information Systems Shared n/a Password policies, applicable to mobile devices, are documented and enforced through technical controls on all company devices or devices approved for BYOD usage, and prohibit the changing of password/PIN lengths and authentication requirements. 8
hipaa 1031.01d1System.34510-01.d hipaa-1031.01d1System.34510-01.d 1031.01d1System.34510-01.d 10 Password Management 1031.01d1System.34510-01.d 01.02 Authorized Access to Information Systems Shared n/a The organization changes passwords for default system accounts, whenever there is any indication of password compromise, at first logon following the issuance of a temporary password, and requires immediate selection of a new password upon account recovery. 6
ISO27001-2013 A.9.2.1 ISO27001-2013_A.9.2.1 ISO 27001:2013 A.9.2.1 Access Control User registration and de-registration Shared n/a A formal user registration and de-registration process shall be implemented to enable assignment of access rights. link 27
ISO27001-2013 A.9.2.4 ISO27001-2013_A.9.2.4 ISO 27001:2013 A.9.2.4 Access Control Management of secret authentication information of users Shared n/a The allocation of secret authentication information shall be controlled through a formal management process. link 21
ISO27001-2013 A.9.3.1 ISO27001-2013_A.9.3.1 ISO 27001:2013 A.9.3.1 Access Control Use of secret authentication information Shared n/a Users shall be required to follow the organization's practices in the use of secret authentication information. link 15
ISO27001-2013 A.9.4.3 ISO27001-2013_A.9.4.3 ISO 27001:2013 A.9.4.3 Access Control Password management system Shared n/a Password management systems shall be interactive and shall ensure quality password. link 22
mp.s.2 Protection of web services and applications mp.s.2 Protection of web services and applications 404 not found n/a n/a 102
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .5.2 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.5.2 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.5.2 Identification and Authentication Authenticate (or verify) the identities of users, processes, or devices, as a prerequisite to allowing access to organizational systems. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Individual authenticators include the following: passwords, key cards, cryptographic devices, and one-time password devices. Initial authenticator content is the actual content of the authenticator, for example, the initial password. In contrast, the requirements about authenticator content include the minimum password length. Developers ship system components with factory default authentication credentials to allow for initial installation and configuration. Default authentication credentials are often well known, easily discoverable, and present a significant security risk. Systems support authenticator management by organization-defined settings and restrictions for various authenticator characteristics including minimum password length, validation time window for time synchronous one-time tokens, and number of allowed rejections during the verification stage of biometric authentication. Authenticator management includes issuing and revoking, when no longer needed, authenticators for temporary access such as that required for remote maintenance. Device authenticators include certificates and passwords. [SP 800-63-3] provides guidance on digital identities. link 24
NIST_SP_800-53_R4 IA-5 NIST_SP_800-53_R4_IA-5 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 IA-5 Identification And Authentication Authenticator Management Shared n/a The organization manages information system authenticators by: a. Verifying, as part of the initial authenticator distribution, the identity of the individual, group, role, or device receiving the authenticator; b. Establishing initial authenticator content for authenticators defined by the organization; c. Ensuring that authenticators have sufficient strength of mechanism for their intended use; d. Establishing and implementing administrative procedures for initial authenticator distribution, for lost/compromised or damaged authenticators, and for revoking authenticators; e. Changing default content of authenticators prior to information system installation; f. Establishing minimum and maximum lifetime restrictions and reuse conditions for authenticators; g. Changing/refreshing authenticators [Assignment: organization-defined time period by authenticator type]; h. Protecting authenticator content from unauthorized disclosure and modification; i. Requiring individuals to take, and having devices implement, specific security safeguards to protect authenticators; and j. Changing authenticators for group/role accounts when membership to those accounts changes. Supplemental Guidance: Individual authenticators include, for example, passwords, tokens, biometrics, PKI certificates, and key cards. Initial authenticator content is the actual content (e.g., the initial password) as opposed to requirements about authenticator content (e.g., minimum password length). In many cases, developers ship information system components with factory default authentication credentials to allow for initial installation and configuration. Default authentication credentials are often well known, easily discoverable, and present a significant security risk. The requirement to protect individual authenticators may be implemented via control PL-4 or PS-6 for authenticators in the possession of individuals and by controls AC-3, AC-6, and SC-28 for authenticators stored within organizational information systems (e.g., passwords stored in hashed or encrypted formats, files containing encrypted or hashed passwords accessible with administrator privileges). Information systems support individual authenticator management by organization-defined settings and restrictions for various authenticator characteristics including, for example, minimum password length, password composition, validation time window for time synchronous one-time tokens, and number of allowed rejections during the verification stage of biometric authentication. Specific actions that can be taken to safeguard authenticators include, for example, maintaining possession of individual authenticators, not loaning or sharing individual authenticators with others, and reporting lost, stolen, or compromised authenticators immediately. Authenticator management includes issuing and revoking, when no longer needed, authenticators for temporary access such as that required for remote maintenance. Device authenticators include, for example, certificates and passwords. Related controls: AC-2, AC-3, AC-6, CM-6, IA-2, IA-4, IA-8, PL-4, PS-5, PS-6, SC-12, SC-13, SC-17, SC-28. References: OMB Memoranda 04-04, 11-11; FIPS Publication 201; NIST Special Publications 800-73, 800-63, 800-76, 800-78; FICAM Roadmap and Implementation Guidance link 18
NIST_SP_800-53_R5 IA-5 NIST_SP_800-53_R5_IA-5 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 IA-5 Identification and Authentication Authenticator Management Shared n/a Manage system authenticators by: a. Verifying, as part of the initial authenticator distribution, the identity of the individual, group, role, service, or device receiving the authenticator; b. Establishing initial authenticator content for any authenticators issued by the organization; c. Ensuring that authenticators have sufficient strength of mechanism for their intended use; d. Establishing and implementing administrative procedures for initial authenticator distribution, for lost or compromised or damaged authenticators, and for revoking authenticators; e. Changing default authenticators prior to first use; f. Changing or refreshing authenticators [Assignment: organization-defined time period by authenticator type] or when [Assignment: organization-defined events] occur; g. Protecting authenticator content from unauthorized disclosure and modification; h. Requiring individuals to take, and having devices implement, specific controls to protect authenticators; and i. Changing authenticators for group or role accounts when membership to those accounts changes. link 18
op.acc.1 Identification op.acc.1 Identification 404 not found n/a n/a 66
op.acc.2 Access requirements op.acc.2 Access requirements 404 not found n/a n/a 64
op.acc.5 Authentication mechanism (external users) op.acc.5 Authentication mechanism (external users) 404 not found n/a n/a 72
op.exp.10 Cryptographic key protection op.exp.10 Cryptographic key protection 404 not found n/a n/a 53
PCI_DSS_v4.0 8.3.10 PCI_DSS_v4.0_8.3.10 PCI DSS v4.0 8.3.10 Requirement 08: Identify Users and Authenticate Access to System Components Strong authentication for users and administrators is established and managed Shared n/a If passwords/passphrases are used as the only authentication factor for customer user access to cardholder data (i.e., in any singlefactor authentication implementation), then guidance is provided to customer users including: • Guidance for customers to change their user passwords/passphrases periodically. • Guidance as to when, and under what circumstances, passwords/passphrases are changed. link 2
PCI_DSS_v4.0 8.3.10.1 PCI_DSS_v4.0_8.3.10.1 PCI DSS v4.0 8.3.10.1 Requirement 08: Identify Users and Authenticate Access to System Components Strong authentication for users and administrators is established and managed Shared n/a If passwords/passphrases are used as the only authentication factor for customer user access (i.e., in any single-factor authentication implementation) then either: • Passwords/passphrases are changed at least once every 90 days, OR • The security posture of accounts is dynamically analyzed, and real-time access to resources is automatically determined accordingly. link 2
PCI_DSS_v4.0 8.3.9 PCI_DSS_v4.0_8.3.9 PCI DSS v4.0 8.3.9 Requirement 08: Identify Users and Authenticate Access to System Components Strong authentication for users and administrators is established and managed Shared n/a If passwords/passphrases are used as the only authentication factor for user access (i.e., in any single-factor authentication implementation) then either: • Passwords/passphrases are changed at least once every 90 days, OR • The security posture of accounts is dynamically analyzed, and real-time access to resources is automatically determined accordingly. link 2
PCI_DSS_v4.0 8.6.3 PCI_DSS_v4.0_8.6.3 PCI DSS v4.0 8.6.3 Requirement 08: Identify Users and Authenticate Access to System Components Use of application and system accounts and associated authentication factors is strictly managed Shared n/a Passwords/passphrases for any application and system accounts are protected against misuse as follows: • Passwords/passphrases are changed periodically (at the frequency defined in the entity’s targeted risk analysis, which is performed according to all elements specified in Requirement 12.3.1) and upon suspicion or confirmation of compromise. • Passwords/passphrases are constructed with sufficient complexity appropriate for how frequently the entity changes the passwords/passphrases. link 6
Initiatives usage
Initiative DisplayName Initiative Id Initiative Category State Type
FedRAMP High d5264498-16f4-418a-b659-fa7ef418175f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP Moderate e95f5a9f-57ad-4d03-bb0b-b1d16db93693 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
HITRUST/HIPAA a169a624-5599-4385-a696-c8d643089fab Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
ISO 27001:2013 89c6cddc-1c73-4ac1-b19c-54d1a15a42f2 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-171 Rev. 2 03055927-78bd-4236-86c0-f36125a10dc9 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 cf25b9c1-bd23-4eb6-bd2c-f4f3ac644a5f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 179d1daa-458f-4e47-8086-2a68d0d6c38f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
PCI DSS v4 c676748e-3af9-4e22-bc28-50feed564afb Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
Spain ENS 175daf90-21e1-4fec-b745-7b4c909aa94c Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
History
Date/Time (UTC ymd) (i) Change type Change detail
2022-09-27 16:35:32 change Minor (1.0.0 > 1.1.0)
2022-09-13 16:35:29 add 3ae68d9a-5696-8c32-62d3-c6f9c52e437c
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