last sync: 2023-Feb-06 18:40:05 UTC

Azure Policy definition

[Preview]: Certificates should have the specified maximum validity period

Name [Preview]: Certificates should have the specified maximum validity period
Azure Portal
Id 0a075868-4c26-42ef-914c-5bc007359560
Version 2.2.0-preview
details on versioning
Category Key Vault
Microsoft docs
Description Manage your organizational compliance requirements by specifying the maximum amount of time that a certificate can be valid within your key vault.
Mode Microsoft.KeyVault.Data
Type BuiltIn
Preview True
Deprecated FALSE
Effect Default
Audit
Allowed
audit, Audit, deny, Deny, disabled, Disabled
RBAC
Role(s)
none
Rule
Aliases
Rule
ResourceTypes
Compliance The following 11 compliance controls are associated with this Policy definition '[Preview]: Certificates should have the specified maximum validity period' (0a075868-4c26-42ef-914c-5bc007359560)
Control Domain Control Name MetadataId Category Title Owner Requirements Description Info Policy#
Azure_Security_Benchmark_v3.0 DP-7 Azure_Security_Benchmark_v3.0_DP-7 Azure Security Benchmark DP-7 Data Protection Use a secure certificate management process Shared **Security Principle:** Document and implement an enterprise certificate management standard, processes and procedures which includes the certificate lifecycle control, and certificate policies (if a public key infrastructure is needed). Ensure certificates used by the critical services in your organization are inventoried, tracked, monitored, and renewed timely using automated mechanism to avoid service disruption. **Azure Guidance:** Use Azure Key Vault to create and control the certificate lifecycle, including creation/import, rotation, revocation, storage, and purge of the certificate. Ensure the certificate generation follows the defined standard without using any insecure properties, such as insufficient key size, overly long validity period, insecure cryptography and so on. Setup automatic rotation of the certificate in Azure Key Vault and Azure service (if supported) based on the defined schedule and when there is a certificate expiration. If automatic rotation is not supported in the front application, use a manual rotation in Azure Key Vault. Avoid using self-signed certificate and wildcard certificate in your critical services due to the limited security assurance. Instead, you can create public signed certificate in Azure Key Vault. The following CAs are the current partnered providers with Azure Key Vault. - DigiCert: Azure Key Vault offers OV TLS/SSL certificates with DigiCert. - GlobalSign: Azure Key Vault offers OV TLS/SSL certificates with GlobalSign. Note: Use only approved Certificate Authority (CA) and ensure the known bad CA root/intermediate certificates and certificates issued by these CAs are disabled. **Implementation and additional context:** Get started with Key Vault certificates: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/key-vault/certificates/certificate-scenarios Certificate Access Control in Azure Key Vault: https://docs.microsoft.com/azure/key-vault/certificates/certificate-access-control n/a link 1
CMMC_2.0_L2 IA.L1-3.5.2 CMMC_2.0_L2_IA.L1-3.5.2 404 not found n/a n/a 18
FedRAMP_High_R4 IA-5 FedRAMP_High_R4_IA-5 FedRAMP High IA-5 Identification And Authentication Authenticator Management Shared n/a The organization manages information system authenticators by: a. Verifying, as part of the initial authenticator distribution, the identity of the individual, group, role, or device receiving the authenticator; b. Establishing initial authenticator content for authenticators defined by the organization; c. Ensuring that authenticators have sufficient strength of mechanism for their intended use; d. Establishing and implementing administrative procedures for initial authenticator distribution, for lost/compromised or damaged authenticators, and for revoking authenticators; e. Changing default content of authenticators prior to information system installation; f. Establishing minimum and maximum lifetime restrictions and reuse conditions for authenticators; g. Changing/refreshing authenticators [Assignment: organization-defined time period by authenticator type]; h. Protecting authenticator content from unauthorized disclosure and modification; i. Requiring individuals to take, and having devices implement, specific security safeguards to protect authenticators; and j. Changing authenticators for group/role accounts when membership to those accounts changes. Supplemental Guidance: Individual authenticators include, for example, passwords, tokens, biometrics, PKI certificates, and key cards. Initial authenticator content is the actual content (e.g., the initial password) as opposed to requirements about authenticator content (e.g., minimum password length). In many cases, developers ship information system components with factory default authentication credentials to allow for initial installation and configuration. Default authentication credentials are often well known, easily discoverable, and present a significant security risk. The requirement to protect individual authenticators may be implemented via control PL-4 or PS-6 for authenticators in the possession of individuals and by controls AC-3, AC-6, and SC-28 for authenticators stored within organizational information systems (e.g., passwords stored in hashed or encrypted formats, files containing encrypted or hashed passwords accessible with administrator privileges). Information systems support individual authenticator management by organization-defined settings and restrictions for various authenticator characteristics including, for example, minimum password length, password composition, validation time window for time synchronous one-time tokens, and number of allowed rejections during the verification stage of biometric authentication. Specific actions that can be taken to safeguard authenticators include, for example, maintaining possession of individual authenticators, not loaning or sharing individual authenticators with others, and reporting lost, stolen, or compromised authenticators immediately. Authenticator management includes issuing and revoking, when no longer needed, authenticators for temporary access such as that required for remote maintenance. Device authenticators include, for example, certificates and passwords. Related controls: AC-2, AC-3, AC-6, CM-6, IA-2, IA-4, IA-8, PL-4, PS-5, PS-6, SC-12, SC-13, SC-17, SC-28. References: OMB Memoranda 04-04, 11-11; FIPS Publication 201; NIST Special Publications 800-73, 800-63, 800-76, 800-78; FICAM Roadmap and Implementation Guidance link 18
FedRAMP_Moderate_R4 IA-5 FedRAMP_Moderate_R4_IA-5 FedRAMP Moderate IA-5 Identification And Authentication Authenticator Management Shared n/a The organization manages information system authenticators by: a. Verifying, as part of the initial authenticator distribution, the identity of the individual, group, role, or device receiving the authenticator; b. Establishing initial authenticator content for authenticators defined by the organization; c. Ensuring that authenticators have sufficient strength of mechanism for their intended use; d. Establishing and implementing administrative procedures for initial authenticator distribution, for lost/compromised or damaged authenticators, and for revoking authenticators; e. Changing default content of authenticators prior to information system installation; f. Establishing minimum and maximum lifetime restrictions and reuse conditions for authenticators; g. Changing/refreshing authenticators [Assignment: organization-defined time period by authenticator type]; h. Protecting authenticator content from unauthorized disclosure and modification; i. Requiring individuals to take, and having devices implement, specific security safeguards to protect authenticators; and j. Changing authenticators for group/role accounts when membership to those accounts changes. Supplemental Guidance: Individual authenticators include, for example, passwords, tokens, biometrics, PKI certificates, and key cards. Initial authenticator content is the actual content (e.g., the initial password) as opposed to requirements about authenticator content (e.g., minimum password length). In many cases, developers ship information system components with factory default authentication credentials to allow for initial installation and configuration. Default authentication credentials are often well known, easily discoverable, and present a significant security risk. The requirement to protect individual authenticators may be implemented via control PL-4 or PS-6 for authenticators in the possession of individuals and by controls AC-3, AC-6, and SC-28 for authenticators stored within organizational information systems (e.g., passwords stored in hashed or encrypted formats, files containing encrypted or hashed passwords accessible with administrator privileges). Information systems support individual authenticator management by organization-defined settings and restrictions for various authenticator characteristics including, for example, minimum password length, password composition, validation time window for time synchronous one-time tokens, and number of allowed rejections during the verification stage of biometric authentication. Specific actions that can be taken to safeguard authenticators include, for example, maintaining possession of individual authenticators, not loaning or sharing individual authenticators with others, and reporting lost, stolen, or compromised authenticators immediately. Authenticator management includes issuing and revoking, when no longer needed, authenticators for temporary access such as that required for remote maintenance. Device authenticators include, for example, certificates and passwords. Related controls: AC-2, AC-3, AC-6, CM-6, IA-2, IA-4, IA-8, PL-4, PS-5, PS-6, SC-12, SC-13, SC-17, SC-28. References: OMB Memoranda 04-04, 11-11; FIPS Publication 201; NIST Special Publications 800-73, 800-63, 800-76, 800-78; FICAM Roadmap and Implementation Guidance link 18
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .5.2 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.5.2 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.5.2 Identification and Authentication Authenticate (or verify) the identities of users, processes, or devices, as a prerequisite to allowing access to organizational systems. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Individual authenticators include the following: passwords, key cards, cryptographic devices, and one-time password devices. Initial authenticator content is the actual content of the authenticator, for example, the initial password. In contrast, the requirements about authenticator content include the minimum password length. Developers ship system components with factory default authentication credentials to allow for initial installation and configuration. Default authentication credentials are often well known, easily discoverable, and present a significant security risk. Systems support authenticator management by organization-defined settings and restrictions for various authenticator characteristics including minimum password length, validation time window for time synchronous one-time tokens, and number of allowed rejections during the verification stage of biometric authentication. Authenticator management includes issuing and revoking, when no longer needed, authenticators for temporary access such as that required for remote maintenance. Device authenticators include certificates and passwords. [SP 800-63-3] provides guidance on digital identities. link 24
NIST_SP_800-53_R4 IA-5 NIST_SP_800-53_R4_IA-5 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 IA-5 Identification And Authentication Authenticator Management Shared n/a The organization manages information system authenticators by: a. Verifying, as part of the initial authenticator distribution, the identity of the individual, group, role, or device receiving the authenticator; b. Establishing initial authenticator content for authenticators defined by the organization; c. Ensuring that authenticators have sufficient strength of mechanism for their intended use; d. Establishing and implementing administrative procedures for initial authenticator distribution, for lost/compromised or damaged authenticators, and for revoking authenticators; e. Changing default content of authenticators prior to information system installation; f. Establishing minimum and maximum lifetime restrictions and reuse conditions for authenticators; g. Changing/refreshing authenticators [Assignment: organization-defined time period by authenticator type]; h. Protecting authenticator content from unauthorized disclosure and modification; i. Requiring individuals to take, and having devices implement, specific security safeguards to protect authenticators; and j. Changing authenticators for group/role accounts when membership to those accounts changes. Supplemental Guidance: Individual authenticators include, for example, passwords, tokens, biometrics, PKI certificates, and key cards. Initial authenticator content is the actual content (e.g., the initial password) as opposed to requirements about authenticator content (e.g., minimum password length). In many cases, developers ship information system components with factory default authentication credentials to allow for initial installation and configuration. Default authentication credentials are often well known, easily discoverable, and present a significant security risk. The requirement to protect individual authenticators may be implemented via control PL-4 or PS-6 for authenticators in the possession of individuals and by controls AC-3, AC-6, and SC-28 for authenticators stored within organizational information systems (e.g., passwords stored in hashed or encrypted formats, files containing encrypted or hashed passwords accessible with administrator privileges). Information systems support individual authenticator management by organization-defined settings and restrictions for various authenticator characteristics including, for example, minimum password length, password composition, validation time window for time synchronous one-time tokens, and number of allowed rejections during the verification stage of biometric authentication. Specific actions that can be taken to safeguard authenticators include, for example, maintaining possession of individual authenticators, not loaning or sharing individual authenticators with others, and reporting lost, stolen, or compromised authenticators immediately. Authenticator management includes issuing and revoking, when no longer needed, authenticators for temporary access such as that required for remote maintenance. Device authenticators include, for example, certificates and passwords. Related controls: AC-2, AC-3, AC-6, CM-6, IA-2, IA-4, IA-8, PL-4, PS-5, PS-6, SC-12, SC-13, SC-17, SC-28. References: OMB Memoranda 04-04, 11-11; FIPS Publication 201; NIST Special Publications 800-73, 800-63, 800-76, 800-78; FICAM Roadmap and Implementation Guidance link 18
NIST_SP_800-53_R5 IA-5 NIST_SP_800-53_R5_IA-5 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 IA-5 Identification and Authentication Authenticator Management Shared n/a Manage system authenticators by: a. Verifying, as part of the initial authenticator distribution, the identity of the individual, group, role, service, or device receiving the authenticator; b. Establishing initial authenticator content for any authenticators issued by the organization; c. Ensuring that authenticators have sufficient strength of mechanism for their intended use; d. Establishing and implementing administrative procedures for initial authenticator distribution, for lost or compromised or damaged authenticators, and for revoking authenticators; e. Changing default authenticators prior to first use; f. Changing or refreshing authenticators [Assignment: organization-defined time period by authenticator type] or when [Assignment: organization-defined events] occur; g. Protecting authenticator content from unauthorized disclosure and modification; h. Requiring individuals to take, and having devices implement, specific controls to protect authenticators; and i. Changing authenticators for group or role accounts when membership to those accounts changes. link 18
RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016 21.1 RBI_CSF_Banks_v2016_21.1 Metrics Metrics-21.1 n/a Develop a comprehensive set of metrics that provide for prospective and retrospective measures, like key performance indicators and key risk indicators 15
RBI_ITF_NBFC_v2017 3.1.h RBI_ITF_NBFC_v2017_3.1.h RBI IT Framework 3.1.h Information and Cyber Security Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)-3.1 n/a The IS Policy must provide for a IS framework with the following basic tenets: Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) - NBFCs may increase the usage of PKI to ensure confidentiality of data, access control, data integrity, authentication and nonrepudiation. link 32
RBI_ITF_NBFC_v2017 3.8 RBI_ITF_NBFC_v2017_3.8 RBI IT Framework 3.8 Information and Cyber Security Digital Signatures-3.8 n/a A Digital Signature Certificate authenticates entity???s identity electronically. It also provides a high level of security for online transactions by ensuring absolute privacy of the information exchanged using a Digital Signature Certificate. NBFCs may consider use of Digital signatures to protect the authenticity and integrity of important electronic documents and also for high value fund transfer. link 7
SOC_2 CC6.1 SOC_2_CC6.1 SOC 2 Type 2 CC6.1 Logical and Physical Access Controls Logical access security software, infrastructure, and architectures Shared The customer is responsible for implementing this recommendation. The following points of focus, specifically related to all engagements using the trust services criteria, highlight important characteristics relating to this criterion: • Identifies and Manages the Inventory of Information Assets — The entity identifies, Page 29 TSP Ref. # TRUST SERVICES CRITERIA AND POINTS OF FOCUS inventories, classifies, and manages information assets. • Restricts Logical Access — Logical access to information assets, including hardware, data (at-rest, during processing, or in transmission), software, administrative authorities, mobile devices, output, and offline system components is restricted through the use of access control software and rule sets. • Identifies and Authenticates Users — Persons, infrastructure, and software are identified and authenticated prior to accessing information assets, whether locally or remotely. • Considers Network Segmentation — Network segmentation permits unrelated portions of the entity's information system to be isolated from each other. • Manages Points of Access — Points of access by outside entities and the types of data that flow through the points of access are identified, inventoried, and managed. The types of individuals and systems using each point of access are identified, documented, and managed. • Restricts Access to Information Assets — Combinations of data classification, separate data structures, port restrictions, access protocol restrictions, user identification, and digital certificates are used to establish access-control rules for information assets. • Manages Identification and Authentication — Identification and authentication requirements are established, documented, and managed for individuals and systems accessing entity information, infrastructure, and software. • Manages Credentials for Infrastructure and Software — New internal and external infrastructure and software are registered, authorized, and documented prior to being granted access credentials and implemented on the network or access point. Credentials are removed and access is disabled when access is no longer required or the infrastructure and software are no longer in use. • Uses Encryption to Protect Data — The entity uses encryption to supplement other measures used to protect data at rest, when such protections are deemed appropriate based on assessed risk. • Protects Encryption Keys — Processes are in place to protect encryption keys during generation, storage, use, and destruction 80
History
Date/Time (UTC ymd) (i) Change type Change detail
2022-04-01 20:29:14 change Minor, suffix remains equal (2.1.0-preview > 2.2.0-preview)
2020-12-11 15:42:52 change Minor, suffix remains equal (2.0.0-preview > 2.1.0-preview)
2020-09-02 14:03:46 change Previous DisplayName: [Preview]: Manage certificate validity period
2019-11-19 11:26:09 change Previous DisplayName: [Preview]: Certificates should not have a lengthy validity period
Initiatives
usage
Initiative DisplayName Initiative Id Initiative Category State Type
[Preview]: CMMC 2.0 Level 2 4e50fd13-098b-3206-61d6-d1d78205cb45 Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
[Preview]: Reserve Bank of India - IT Framework for Banks d0d5578d-cc08-2b22-31e3-f525374f235a Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
[Preview]: Reserve Bank of India - IT Framework for NBFC 7f89f09c-48c1-f28d-1bd5-84f3fb22f86c Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
Azure Security Benchmark 1f3afdf9-d0c9-4c3d-847f-89da613e70a8 Security Center GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP High d5264498-16f4-418a-b659-fa7ef418175f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP Moderate e95f5a9f-57ad-4d03-bb0b-b1d16db93693 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-171 Rev. 2 03055927-78bd-4236-86c0-f36125a10dc9 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 cf25b9c1-bd23-4eb6-bd2c-f4f3ac644a5f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 179d1daa-458f-4e47-8086-2a68d0d6c38f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
SOC 2 Type 2 4054785f-702b-4a98-9215-009cbd58b141 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
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