last sync: 2024-Apr-24 17:46:58 UTC

Vulnerability assessment should be enabled on your Synapse workspaces

Azure BuiltIn Policy definition

Source Azure Portal
Display name Vulnerability assessment should be enabled on your Synapse workspaces
Id 0049a6b3-a662-4f3e-8635-39cf44ace45a
Version 1.0.0
Details on versioning
Category Synapse
Microsoft Learn
Description Discover, track, and remediate potential vulnerabilities by configuring recurring SQL vulnerability assessment scans on your Synapse workspaces.
Mode Indexed
Type BuiltIn
Preview False
Deprecated False
Effect Default
AuditIfNotExists
Allowed
AuditIfNotExists, Disabled
RBAC role(s) none
Rule aliases THEN-ExistenceCondition (1)
Alias Namespace ResourceType DefaultPath Modifiable
Microsoft.Synapse/workspaces/vulnerabilityAssessments/recurringScans.isEnabled Microsoft.Synapse workspaces/vulnerabilityAssessments properties.recurringScans.isEnabled false
Rule resource types IF (1)
Microsoft.Synapse/workspaces
Compliance
The following 12 compliance controls are associated with this Policy definition 'Vulnerability assessment should be enabled on your Synapse workspaces' (0049a6b3-a662-4f3e-8635-39cf44ace45a)
Control Domain Control Name MetadataId Category Title Owner Requirements Description Info Policy#
ACAT_Security_Policies ACAT_Security_Policies ACAT Security Policies Guidelines for M365 Certification Protecting systems and resources Shared n/a Ensures that apps have strong security and compliance practices in place to protect customer data, security, and privacy. link 24
C.04.3 - Timelines C.04.3 - Timelines 404 not found n/a n/a 26
CMMC_2.0_L2 RA.L2-3.11.2 CMMC_2.0_L2_RA.L2-3.11.2 404 not found n/a n/a 19
CMMC_2.0_L2 RA.L2-3.11.3 CMMC_2.0_L2_RA.L2-3.11.3 404 not found n/a n/a 19
FedRAMP_High_R4 RA-5 FedRAMP_High_R4_RA-5 FedRAMP High RA-5 Risk Assessment Vulnerability Scanning Shared n/a The organization: a. Scans for vulnerabilities in the information system and hosted applications [Assignment: organization-defined frequency and/or randomly in accordance with organization-defined process] and when new vulnerabilities potentially affecting the system/applications are identified and reported; b. Employs vulnerability scanning tools and techniques that facilitate interoperability among tools and automate parts of the vulnerability management process by using standards for: 1. Enumerating platforms, software flaws, and improper configurations; 2. Formatting checklists and test procedures; and 3. Measuring vulnerability impact; c. Analyzes vulnerability scan reports and results from security control assessments; d. Remediates legitimate vulnerabilities [Assignment: organization-defined response times], in accordance with an organizational assessment of risk; and e. Shares information obtained from the vulnerability scanning process and security control assessments with [Assignment: organization-defined personnel or roles] to help eliminate similar vulnerabilities in other information systems (i.e., systemic weaknesses or deficiencies). Supplemental Guidance: Security categorization of information systems guides the frequency and comprehensiveness of vulnerability scans. Organizations determine the required vulnerability scanning for all information system components, ensuring that potential sources of vulnerabilities such as networked printers, scanners, and copiers are not overlooked. Vulnerability analyses for custom software applications may require additional approaches such as static analysis, dynamic analysis, binary analysis, or a hybrid of the three approaches. Organizations can employ these analysis approaches in a variety of tools (e.g., web-based application scanners, static analysis tools, binary analyzers) and in source code reviews. Vulnerability scanning includes, for example: (i) scanning for patch levels; (ii) scanning for functions, ports, protocols, and services that should not be accessible to users or devices; and (iii) scanning for improperly configured or incorrectly operating information flow control mechanisms. Organizations consider using tools that express vulnerabilities in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) naming convention and that use the Open Vulnerability Assessment Language (OVAL) to determine/test for the presence of vulnerabilities. Suggested sources for vulnerability information include the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) listing and the National Vulnerability Database (NVD). In addition, security control assessments such as red team exercises provide other sources of potential vulnerabilities for which to scan. Organizations also consider using tools that express vulnerability impact by the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS). Related controls: CA-2, CA-7, CM-4, CM-6, RA-2, RA-3, SA-11, SI-2. References: NIST Special Publications 800-40, 800-70, 800-115; Web: http://cwe.mitre.org, http://nvd.nist.gov. link 21
FedRAMP_Moderate_R4 RA-5 FedRAMP_Moderate_R4_RA-5 FedRAMP Moderate RA-5 Risk Assessment Vulnerability Scanning Shared n/a The organization: a. Scans for vulnerabilities in the information system and hosted applications [Assignment: organization-defined frequency and/or randomly in accordance with organization-defined process] and when new vulnerabilities potentially affecting the system/applications are identified and reported; b. Employs vulnerability scanning tools and techniques that facilitate interoperability among tools and automate parts of the vulnerability management process by using standards for: 1. Enumerating platforms, software flaws, and improper configurations; 2. Formatting checklists and test procedures; and 3. Measuring vulnerability impact; c. Analyzes vulnerability scan reports and results from security control assessments; d. Remediates legitimate vulnerabilities [Assignment: organization-defined response times], in accordance with an organizational assessment of risk; and e. Shares information obtained from the vulnerability scanning process and security control assessments with [Assignment: organization-defined personnel or roles] to help eliminate similar vulnerabilities in other information systems (i.e., systemic weaknesses or deficiencies). Supplemental Guidance: Security categorization of information systems guides the frequency and comprehensiveness of vulnerability scans. Organizations determine the required vulnerability scanning for all information system components, ensuring that potential sources of vulnerabilities such as networked printers, scanners, and copiers are not overlooked. Vulnerability analyses for custom software applications may require additional approaches such as static analysis, dynamic analysis, binary analysis, or a hybrid of the three approaches. Organizations can employ these analysis approaches in a variety of tools (e.g., web-based application scanners, static analysis tools, binary analyzers) and in source code reviews. Vulnerability scanning includes, for example: (i) scanning for patch levels; (ii) scanning for functions, ports, protocols, and services that should not be accessible to users or devices; and (iii) scanning for improperly configured or incorrectly operating information flow control mechanisms. Organizations consider using tools that express vulnerabilities in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) naming convention and that use the Open Vulnerability Assessment Language (OVAL) to determine/test for the presence of vulnerabilities. Suggested sources for vulnerability information include the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) listing and the National Vulnerability Database (NVD). In addition, security control assessments such as red team exercises provide other sources of potential vulnerabilities for which to scan. Organizations also consider using tools that express vulnerability impact by the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS). Related controls: CA-2, CA-7, CM-4, CM-6, RA-2, RA-3, SA-11, SI-2. References: NIST Special Publications 800-40, 800-70, 800-115; Web: http://cwe.mitre.org, http://nvd.nist.gov. link 21
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .11.2 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.11.2 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.11.2 Risk Assessment Scan for vulnerabilities in organizational systems and applications periodically and when new vulnerabilities affecting those systems and applications are identified. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Organizations determine the required vulnerability scanning for all system components, ensuring that potential sources of vulnerabilities such as networked printers, scanners, and copiers are not overlooked. The vulnerabilities to be scanned are readily updated as new vulnerabilities are discovered, announced, and scanning methods developed. This process ensures that potential vulnerabilities in the system are identified and addressed as quickly as possible. Vulnerability analyses for custom software applications may require additional approaches such as static analysis, dynamic analysis, binary analysis, or a hybrid of the three approaches. Organizations can employ these analysis approaches in source code reviews and in a variety of tools (e.g., static analysis tools, web-based application scanners, binary analyzers) and in source code reviews. Vulnerability scanning includes: scanning for patch levels; scanning for functions, ports, protocols, and services that should not be accessible to users or devices; and scanning for improperly configured or incorrectly operating information flow control mechanisms. To facilitate interoperability, organizations consider using products that are Security Content Automated Protocol (SCAP)-validated, scanning tools that express vulnerabilities in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) naming convention, and that employ the Open Vulnerability Assessment Language (OVAL) to determine the presence of system vulnerabilities. Sources for vulnerability information include the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) listing and the National Vulnerability Database (NVD). Security assessments, such as red team exercises, provide additional sources of potential vulnerabilities for which to scan. Organizations also consider using scanning tools that express vulnerability impact by the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS). In certain situations, the nature of the vulnerability scanning may be more intrusive or the system component that is the subject of the scanning may contain highly sensitive information. Privileged access authorization to selected system components facilitates thorough vulnerability scanning and protects the sensitive nature of such scanning. [SP 800-40] provides guidance on vulnerability management. link 22
NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3 .11.3 NIST_SP_800-171_R2_3.11.3 NIST SP 800-171 R2 3.11.3 Risk Assessment Remediate vulnerabilities in accordance with risk assessments. Shared Microsoft and the customer share responsibilities for implementing this requirement. Vulnerabilities discovered, for example, via the scanning conducted in response to 3.11.2, are remediated with consideration of the related assessment of risk. The consideration of risk influences the prioritization of remediation efforts and the level of effort to be expended in the remediation for specific vulnerabilities. link 21
NIST_SP_800-53_R4 RA-5 NIST_SP_800-53_R4_RA-5 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 RA-5 Risk Assessment Vulnerability Scanning Shared n/a The organization: a. Scans for vulnerabilities in the information system and hosted applications [Assignment: organization-defined frequency and/or randomly in accordance with organization-defined process] and when new vulnerabilities potentially affecting the system/applications are identified and reported; b. Employs vulnerability scanning tools and techniques that facilitate interoperability among tools and automate parts of the vulnerability management process by using standards for: 1. Enumerating platforms, software flaws, and improper configurations; 2. Formatting checklists and test procedures; and 3. Measuring vulnerability impact; c. Analyzes vulnerability scan reports and results from security control assessments; d. Remediates legitimate vulnerabilities [Assignment: organization-defined response times], in accordance with an organizational assessment of risk; and e. Shares information obtained from the vulnerability scanning process and security control assessments with [Assignment: organization-defined personnel or roles] to help eliminate similar vulnerabilities in other information systems (i.e., systemic weaknesses or deficiencies). Supplemental Guidance: Security categorization of information systems guides the frequency and comprehensiveness of vulnerability scans. Organizations determine the required vulnerability scanning for all information system components, ensuring that potential sources of vulnerabilities such as networked printers, scanners, and copiers are not overlooked. Vulnerability analyses for custom software applications may require additional approaches such as static analysis, dynamic analysis, binary analysis, or a hybrid of the three approaches. Organizations can employ these analysis approaches in a variety of tools (e.g., web-based application scanners, static analysis tools, binary analyzers) and in source code reviews. Vulnerability scanning includes, for example: (i) scanning for patch levels; (ii) scanning for functions, ports, protocols, and services that should not be accessible to users or devices; and (iii) scanning for improperly configured or incorrectly operating information flow control mechanisms. Organizations consider using tools that express vulnerabilities in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) naming convention and that use the Open Vulnerability Assessment Language (OVAL) to determine/test for the presence of vulnerabilities. Suggested sources for vulnerability information include the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) listing and the National Vulnerability Database (NVD). In addition, security control assessments such as red team exercises provide other sources of potential vulnerabilities for which to scan. Organizations also consider using tools that express vulnerability impact by the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS). Related controls: CA-2, CA-7, CM-4, CM-6, RA-2, RA-3, SA-11, SI-2. References: NIST Special Publications 800-40, 800-70, 800-115; Web: http://cwe.mitre.org, http://nvd.nist.gov. link 21
NIST_SP_800-53_R5 RA-5 NIST_SP_800-53_R5_RA-5 NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 RA-5 Risk Assessment Vulnerability Monitoring and Scanning Shared n/a a. Monitor and scan for vulnerabilities in the system and hosted applications [Assignment: organization-defined frequency and/or randomly in accordance with organization-defined process] and when new vulnerabilities potentially affecting the system are identified and reported; b. Employ vulnerability monitoring tools and techniques that facilitate interoperability among tools and automate parts of the vulnerability management process by using standards for: 1. Enumerating platforms, software flaws, and improper configurations; 2. Formatting checklists and test procedures; and 3. Measuring vulnerability impact; c. Analyze vulnerability scan reports and results from vulnerability monitoring; d. Remediate legitimate vulnerabilities [Assignment: organization-defined response times] in accordance with an organizational assessment of risk; e. Share information obtained from the vulnerability monitoring process and control assessments with [Assignment: organization-defined personnel or roles] to help eliminate similar vulnerabilities in other systems; and f. Employ vulnerability monitoring tools that include the capability to readily update the vulnerabilities to be scanned. link 21
RBI_ITF_NBFC_v2017 3.3 RBI_ITF_NBFC_v2017_3.3 RBI IT Framework 3.3 Information and Cyber Security Vulnerability Management-3.3 n/a A vulnerability can be defined as an inherent configuration flaw in an organization???s information technology base, whether hardware or software, which can be exploited by a third party to gather sensitive information regarding the organization. Vulnerability management is an ongoing process to determine the process of eliminating or mitigating vulnerabilities based upon the risk and cost associated with the vulnerabilities. NBFCs may devise a strategy for managing and eliminating vulnerabilities and such strategy may clearly be communicated in the Cyber Security policy link 12
U.17.1 - Encrypted U.17.1 - Encrypted 404 not found n/a n/a 5
Initiatives usage
Initiative DisplayName Initiative Id Initiative Category State Type
[Preview]: CMMC 2.0 Level 2 4e50fd13-098b-3206-61d6-d1d78205cb45 Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
[Preview]: Reserve Bank of India - IT Framework for NBFC 7f89f09c-48c1-f28d-1bd5-84f3fb22f86c Regulatory Compliance Preview BuiltIn
ACAT for Microsoft 365 Certification 80307b86-ab81-45ab-bf4f-4e0b93cf3dd5 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP High d5264498-16f4-418a-b659-fa7ef418175f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
FedRAMP Moderate e95f5a9f-57ad-4d03-bb0b-b1d16db93693 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-171 Rev. 2 03055927-78bd-4236-86c0-f36125a10dc9 Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 cf25b9c1-bd23-4eb6-bd2c-f4f3ac644a5f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 5 179d1daa-458f-4e47-8086-2a68d0d6c38f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
NL BIO Cloud Theme 6ce73208-883e-490f-a2ac-44aac3b3687f Regulatory Compliance GA BuiltIn
History
Date/Time (UTC ymd) (i) Change type Change detail
2021-01-22 09:14:53 add 0049a6b3-a662-4f3e-8635-39cf44ace45a
JSON compare n/a
JSON
api-version=2021-06-01
EPAC